Archive for the ‘Weight loss’ Category

The “Point” Workout

                                 ^ She loves the Point Workout 🙂

Finding a plan that helps you reach your goals is just as much about finding something that works for your lifestyle, as it is finding something that is well designed.  For some people, a highly structured plan that tells them precisely what to do every day of the week is exactly what they need.  But for others, this will only lead to burnout.  You know what kind of person you are.  No matter how much you want to make a change and are committed to following along with a prescribed routine, we both know if that’s not your style, you’re going to get sick of “having” to do a certain workout on a given day, and quit.  Workouts shouldn’t feel like a chore.  They should give you the feeling of motivation, empowerment, and hope that you are making positive changes in your body and health.

Some of you may find success by having a little more autonomy in your workout routine,  and that’s alright.  Unfortunately, 99.9% of fitness bloggers, websites, “experts”, don’t create routines that allow for choice.  They give you a set of exercises to complete, when to complete them, and set you off on your merry way.  While this isn’t inherently bad, it doesn’t take into account the people who don’t/can’t stick to this method of training.  For that reason, I’ve created a point-based workout system whereby various workouts have been assigned different point totals.  Each week your only goal is to hit a specific number of points.  Assigned points, total points required, and a few other key variables have been precisely calculated throughout trial and error with real-life clients.  Rest assured, by sticking to the very general structure of this workout, you WILL make progress, you WILL develop the body you want, and you WILL improve your health.

The only structure you need to follow for this workout to be a success is as follows:

  1. Use the workouts  listed for each point category, as these have been found to be most effective
  2. Don’t repeat the same workout back-to-back days
  3. Two days of rest a week is generally a good idea

1 Point Workouts – Good for days you are feeling less motivated, lack time for a full workout, or need a break but don’t want to skip working out completely.  These workouts typically focus on one element of fitness, i.e. cardio, weight training, and are relatively simple in nature.  You will not want to rely on these workouts too often as they are beginner in nature and a heavy emphasis on 1-pointers will not get you to your goals. 

  • 30-minute jog at a steady pace
  • Weight training one body part, i.e. performing all chest exercises, all bicep exercises, etc.
  • Bodyweight Blast Workout – 100 bodyweight squats/100 crunches/100 burpees
  • 15 minutes HIIT (high intensity interval training) jump roping
  • 1 hour of yoga
  • 45 minutes cycling at a steady pace
  • 20 minutes row machine
  • Jumper – 25 box jumps/ 25 jump squats/ 25 jump jacks.  Do 4 rounds total.

2 Point Workouts – These workouts bump the intensity.  Filling this into your weekly routine will certainly help you begin advancing towards your goals.  Mixing 2-pointers in with higher point workouts is a good formula to ensure you are getting proper rest and not overtraining, if you are a relatively new exerciser.  if you are more advanced, use 2-pointers on days you are feeling a bit sluggish.

  • Weight training – push/pull format , pick one of the following groups per day: back/biceps, chest/triceps/ shoulders, legs/abs.  You decide the exercises, just aim for failure on your last rep or two of your final set.
  • 60 minutes jog, steady pace
  • 30 minute swim
  • 60 minutes cycling, steady pace
  • Power Lift Workout – 3 sets of 10 -squats, deadlifts, wide grip pullups (w/assistance if needed), military press, bench press, incline bench press, leg press
  • 30 minutes HIIT (45 seconds work/45 seconds rest) jump roping
  • 30 minutes HIIT (30 seconds elevated pace/45 seconds slower pace) rowing
  • The Longest Mile workout
  • The Slow Burn workout
  • 1 hour spin class/pilates class/intense yoga/group fitness class of your choice
  • The Black Diamond workout

3 Point Workouts – These workouts are no joke.  Incorporating these into your weekly schedule is going to get you to your goals fast.  As your fitness levels progress, you will likely be able to include more and more of these into your routine.  Just be careful not to overdo it if you are still relatively new.  These workouts will include advanced cardio and strength based elements into one routine to create  a serious workout.  Others will provide advanced HIIT only training which will fully exhaust your body.   

  • 60 minutes HIIT spriting, i.e. 30 seconds sprint/1:30 jog, repeat.
  • Power HIIT workout – 3 x 10 Bench Press, HIIT (30 second work/30 second rest) burpees 10 minutes, 3 x 10 Military Press, HIIT (30 second work/30 second rest) mountain climbers 10 minutes, 3 x 10 Lat Pulldown,  HIIT (30 second sprint/30 second cool down) cycling 10 minutes, 3 x 10 deadlifts,  HIIT (30 second sprint/1:30 minute jog) sprinting 10 minutes.  60 seconds rest between weight exercises.  Upon finish third set of weight exercise, go directly into HIIT exercise.  Rest 1 minute after completing each HIIT exercise.
  • The Heart Pounder workout
  • The Dash Workout
  • The Max Effect workout
  • HIIT combo – 20 minutes HIIT cycling, 20 minutes HIIT jump rope, 20 minutes HIIT running
  • Power cycling workout – 60 minutes stationary cycling with dumbbells.  Over the course of an hour, perform 60 lateral raises, 60 front raises, 60 bicep curls, 60 military presses. 60 cross punches.
  • Ab Effect – 500 crunches, 5 minutes planking (break up into as few sets as possible), 500 flutter kicks, 1000 jumps on the jump rope.
  • 25 x 100 workout – Sprint 100 meters, rest 10 seconds, repeat 24 more times.

So looking at what we’ve got, I’ve given you 28 different workouts to follow along with.  This should include more than enough variety to keep you from burning out.  Most people settle into a routine of 5-6 different workouts and repeat those.  That is fine, but if you plan on doing this long-term, make sure to continually include new workouts into your standard routine.  One of the key concepts to any successful training plan is something that is unique to Share It Fitness and what we’ve built our name on; Body Diversity Training.  Simply put, individuals who incorporate various forms of exercise into their routine (weight training, HIIT, yoga, bootcamp style workouts, plyometrics, pilates, cycling) are far more successful, fit, and healthy than those who focus almost exclusively on weight training or cardio training alone.  The Point Workout relies on BDT to help you achieve your goals.  Get diverse when picking your workouts and create your own total body routine that hits your muscles and cardiovascular system in different ways. 

You may be wondering, what do I do with the points I accumulate?  Well, it’s quite simple.  Each week, you want to hit a total point value.  If you go over that value, good for you!  However, make sure you aren’t overtraining because that will have a reverse effect on your progress.  Since this workout is customizable to any fitness level point totals are based on your current fitness ability.  You know where you’re at, don’t underachieve, and find the category that is best for you.

Weekly Point Goals: 7 (beginner), 9 (intermediate), 11 (advanced).  Every 4 weeks, add 2 points to your weekly goal and go all out for that ONE week.  If you feel you can easily progress to the increased level, it’s time to push up to the next level, i.e. beginner to intermediate, intermediate to advanced.  For advanced exercisers, think about adding an extra training day to your routine.  For the most advanced exercisers, you should never be going beyond 18 points in a given week.  Anything more than this will lead to overtraining and possible injury

So there you have it guys; a very simple and easy to follow routine that breaks away from the traditional structure that you’ve probably been used to seeing.  I’ve seen real-life clients make HUGE gains on their own training in this format.  There’s no reason anyone reading this can’t realize the same results.  Keep up the good work, maintain your focus, and good things are sure to follow. 

If you liked this article, be sure to subscribe to the blog so you don’t miss any of our future articles.  Drop by ShareItFitness.com to stay up to date on our full website launch and get yourself a free premium membership in the process!

Do This…Look like That…Total Body Blitz Workout

Fitness is simple..it really is.  Most trainers, websites, exercise DVD makers, etc, want to make it seem like there’s some exact, and hard to comprehend, scientific formula to getting in shape.  They all claim to have figured it out, and purport that THEIR method is the best, and likely, only way to get in shape.  The whole game is designed to confuse you, so you become reliant on them for their advice and/or workouts.  The game is up; this simply isn’t the way fitness works.

Certainly, there are some elements of any successful workout program that must be followed.  We aren’t saying you can just go out, casually lift some weights, run a few miles a week, and develop a killer bod.  It’s not quite that simple.  Problem with so many exercise programs out there today is they take bits and pieces of the three basic elements of a great workout.  P90x, for example, is great at utilizing muscle confusion techniques…but only for a limited period of time.  These workouts aren’t geared for a lifelong body transformation..rather, a 90 day change, at which point, your body has gotten so used to the workout cycle, it stops making progress.

I’ve been in the exercise biz many a year now, and have created Share It Fitness to bring top quality exercise programming to the masses.  I’ve seen what works and what doesn’t.  I know women don’t want to look like men, they simply want to develop that lean, mean, athletic look.  Being fit and sexy isn’t about being deathly skinny and starving yourself.  It’s about having a lean, toned upper body, a strong core, and a powerful and explosive lower body.  Developing this is very simple.  All it takes is self-discipline and a well-crafted plan.  If you stick to the plan below, to a T, I guarantee you will discover the body you’ve always wanted (provided you are eating a healthy diet as well).

It’s time to stop messing around with trends and fads, and start training to change your body and life, permanently.

For each week, each bullet point corresponds to one day.  It is best to do these in order (first bullet point = Monday, second bullet point = Tuesday, etc.) as the routine has been carefully designed to allow your muscles to rest effectively.

Week 1

  • Monday – 60 minutes HIIT cycling (30 seconds 100% intensity, 1:30 60% intensity, repeat for an hour)
  • Tuesday – 5 sets of 8: squats, barbell deadlifts, sumo squats, walking lunges, reverse lunges. 100 box jumps.
  • Wednesday – 30 minutes HIIT jump rope (45 seconds jump, 30 seconds rest. repeat for half-hour)/15 minutes row machine
  • Thursday – 5 sets of 8: bench press, military press, barbell curls, skull crushers, snatch, lat pulldowns. 250 ab reps ( you pick the type of exercises)
  • Friday – 60 minute jog

Tips: Try to complete this Mon-Fri, allowing yourself a full two days off on the weekend.  On weight days, make sure the weight is heavy enough that the 7th and 8th rep are VERY tough to complete.  Training heavy at the beginning of this program is key for establishing  your base.

Week 2:

  • Monday – 5 sets of 8: deadlifts, bulgarian squats, lunges. 5 sets of 50: squat jumps,  calve raises.  Plank for 3 minutes, 60 reverse crunches, 60 hanging knee raises.
  • Tuesday – 60 minutes HIIT cycling (:30/1:30 format)
  • Wednesday – 5 sets of 8: incline bench press, clean and press, overhead tricep extension, bent over barbell row, concentration curls, upright row.
  • Thursday – 60 minutes HIIT running (sprint for 30 seconds/jog for 1:30 minutes)
  • Friday – 5 sets of 8: deadlifts, bulgarian squats, lunges. 50 squat jumps, 50 calve raises.  Plank for 3 minutes, 60 reverse crunches, 60 hanging knee raises

Tips: When there aren’t any sets listed for squat jumps, calve raises, planks, and any ab exercises, complete the number of reps/time in as few sets as possible. i.e. 50 squats as fast as possible, before moving on to the 50 calve raises.  Continue to go heavy on the weight during resistance training.

Week 3:

  • Monday – Super Sets: jump rope 45 seconds/12 box jumps/rest 1 minute.  Repeat 20 times.
  • Tuesday – 5 sets of 8: close grip lat pulldowns, single arm dumbbell rows, dumbbell bench press, dumbbell flys, incline dumbbell curls, standing barbell curls, lat pulldown burnout (100 reps on light weight).
  • Wednesday – Super Sets: jump rope 45 seconds/12 box jumps/rest 1 minute.  Repeat 20 times.
  • Thursday – 100 body weight squats, 60 crunches, 100 alternating lunges, 60 bicycle crunches, 100 knee tucks, 100 flutter kicks, 3 minutes plank.
  • Friday – 30 minutes HIIT cycling (:20/1:00 format), 30 minutes HIIT running (sprint every other .2 miles, i.e. 0-.2 jog, .2-.4 sprint, .4-.6 jog, .6-.8 sprint, .8-1 mile sprint)

Tips: Super sets involve no rest between exercises; only rest when indicated.  Last week of heavy resistance, go hard and heavy.  Make sure you’ve increased the weight on each exercise from Week 1, if only slightly.

Week 4

  • Monday – 3 sets of 20: leg press machine, squats, deadlifts, calve raises, hamstring curl machine, box jumps
  • Tuesday – 20 minutes HIIT cycling (:20/1 min), 20 minutes HIIT rowing (:20/1 min), 20 minutes HIIT jump rope (:30 jump/:30 rest)
  • Wednesday – 3 sets of 20: lat pulldowns, bench press, incline bench press, tricep pushdown, concentration curls, upright rows, bicycle crunches, decline sit ups, hanging leg raises
  • Thursday – 60 minutes casual jog
  • Friday – 3 sets of 20: leg press machine, squats, deadlifts, calve raises, hamstring curl machine, box jumps

Tips: Use light weight on resistance training days.  Do these exercises slow.  Count to a full 4 seconds on the lift, and a full 2 seconds on the lower.

The above routine is part one, of a 12-week total body makeover.  You should already be seeing results after only 4 weeks of training.  As we previewed in week 4, part 2 focuses on increasing total time under tension (TUT) resistance training, which is a departure from the high sets/low rep heavy training that made up weeks 1-3.  Cardio training begins to include more cross-training principles and explosive movements to really develop your lower body while maximizing fat loss at the same time.  Part 3 will introduce complex lift formats such as step sets, drop sets, etc. while combining short, intense bouts of cardio to give you a couple more extreme workouts each week.

Part II of this workout found here…and Part III here.

After 12-weeks, we break down how to continue to push your body over the remaining 40 weeks of the year, to  ensure you are continually making progress and avoiding burnout.  Stay connected to the Share It Fitness launch and ensure a free membership by signing up here, and be sure to subscribe to our blog so you don’t miss the rest of this Total Body Blitz workout.

Secrets to a Supercharged Workout: Burn More Fat, Build More Muscle, Spend Less Time

Think about the last time you walked into a gym.  Odds are you saw the same thing you’ve seen a hundred times before.  The bench press and free weight section is packed to the brim with men, boys lifting for 15 seconds, resting (read: flexing, talking, ogling girls, etc.) for 2 minutes.  Then you’ve got your elliptical and treadmill ladies who spend 40, 50, 60+ minutes plodding along on their machine, the only thing changing is the pages of their US Weekly magazine as they casually flip through.  Throw in a healthy portion of fillers, the people who just kind of mill around, check their phone, text their friends, wait in line for the water fountain, and you’ve got a pretty standard gym anywhere in America.

These people mentioned above usually spend more time at the gym than I do.  This makes sense as most people think more time spent at the gym means they’ve worked harder.  But like almost all things in life, it’s not about what you do, it’s about how you do it. 

You’ve absolutely got to get yourself out of this cycle if you’re one of these people.  The purpose of going to the gym is to make progress; there is no other reason to be at the gym.  If you aren’t doing yourself any good, you’re simply wasting your time.  Mentally, you may feel you are doing something right by going to the gym for 90 minutes a day, but if you look at yourself in the mirror and look pretty much the same as you did 6 months ago, you ain’t doing something right!

Check it out…if you want to look like Sally from accounting, do a Sally from accounting workout (you’ll find these scattered all over the internet).  If you want to look like Ironwoman, Lokelani McMichael (or for you guys, Adrian Peterson) then you’ve got to do short, high-intensity, explosive workouts that replicate the training of professional athletes.  Because you are going to be training at an elevated level, the amount of time spent in the gym can be drastically cut.  IF you are going hard enough, workouts should never go beyond 45 minutes, and in many cases, 30 minutes is all you need.  Think of every infomercial you’ve ever seen….they’re all promising better results in less time.  Well, now you’ve got a non-gimmicky, sure-fire way to achieve better results in less time.  Leave the 5 minute workout DVDs and thigh master for the wannabe’s.

Now, lets get into the nuts and bolts of this format of training.  This type of workout will rely on three pillars; high- intensity interval training, explosive plyometric resistance training, and full-body supersets.  The combination of all three results in a chemical response in your body that provides benefits unseen by standard training methods.  The chemicals involved in this release are HGH (Human Growth Hormone), Testosterone, and IGF-1. 

HIIT

Many of you have submitted questions in the past about running long and slow, as you’ve heard that your body uses fat for fuel during long-duration exercise.  While this is technically true, it doesn’t paint the full picture.  For one, when you stop your long and slow training, your body instantly stops burning fat.  This is because your heart rate hasn’t been elevated enough to raise your metabolism significantly enough to continue to burn calories.  Even more alarming, long slow bouts of cardio signal the release of the hormone cortisol.  Cortisol is a muscle killing chemical that eats up your lean muscle mass.  Think about long-distance runners for a minute…they don’t exactly have muscular physiques, do they? 

The key here is to train at an intensity that elevates your heart rate, so your metabolism continues to burn calories well after your workout has ended.  During the workout you will be burning carbohydrates for energy.  Afterwards, your body will switch to burning fat.  As your heart rate soars, you begin to struggle, and your oxygen demands sky-rocket.  As you inhale more air to meet the needs of your body, your metabolism begins to rise.  This phenomenon is known as EPOC, or post-exercise oxygen consumption. 

Since your carb stores have been depleted during your workout, your body turns to fat stores after your workout to bring your body back to a normal resting state.  The amount of work required to take your body from all out exertion to a normal resting rate is significant, which is why your body continues to burn calories well after you are finished working out.  Some studies suggest that EPOC will cause your body to keep an elevated fat-burning potential for up to 48 hours. 

Want to make use of EPOC and HIIT?  Try either of our jump rope workouts for maximum effect! Found here and here.  If running/biking/swimming/etc is more your thing…try to perform your activity for 20-30 seconds at maximum effort followed by 45 seconds at half-speed.  Repeat this for 20-30 minutes total.

Explosive Plyometric Resistance Training

When I look at an athlete like Adrian Peterson, or UFC fighter Georges St. Pierre, I see a lean, explosive individual.  Their muscle fibers look like they are just itching to explode out of their bodies.  Comparatively, when I look at a powerlifter like Mr. Olympia, Jay Cutler, I see insane size, but I don’t get the same feeling of speed, athleticism, and explosion that the bodies of the other two convey.  Since I’m guessing most of our readers are more concerned with building a lean, athletic appearance, and not so concerned with building 22 inch biceps, training in a way that lends itself towards your goals, is paramount. 

With that said, the old format of lifting as heavy as possible, then resting for minutes on end before repeating is great if you want to look like Mr. Jay Cutler.  Bodybuilders use this technique to add massive size gains to their frames.  If you want to look like a lean, mean, fighting machine, try supersetting standard movements with explosive plyometric exercises.

Use heavy weights (3-4 sets, 6-8 reps) with this technique and limit your rest time (hopefully to nothing!) between the secondary exercise in the pair.

Some examples of training combos would include:

  • Barbell Incline Bench Press supersetted with explosive 20 Mountain Climbers
  • Bentover Barbell Row supersetted with 15 Squat Jumps
  • Lat Pulldowns supersetted with 12 Burpees
  • Front Barbell Squats supersetted with 10 Plyometric Pushups

Make a concerted effort to put maximum effort into the plyometric portion of the superset.  Go about completing these exercises in a calculated, methodical manner.  Think explosive.  Think max intensity.

This type of training will cause your body to wonder what the heck is going on.  Your heart rate is going to soar, hormones are going to be released in far greater quantity, and EPOC is going to come on in full effect. All in all, you’ve just done more for your body than any of those other people spending three times as long in the gym.

Full-Body Supersets

This next piece of advice is great for both men and women, but all you brodies out there, pay special attention.  Whenever I see guys at the gym, they are often supersetting between two exercises, hitting the same body part.  Think, military press and front dumbbell raises.  This is a fantastic way to add size and strength, and is a technique used by many bodybuilders.  However, as I mentioned earlier, I’m going to go out on a limb and guess most of you aren’t body builders.  This type of supersetting doesn’t do much for your metabolism.  In order to continue to build that muscle, while at the same time burning fat, go for full-body supersets.

By combining upper and lower body movements, with adequate intensity, you will cause your body to release greater amounts of HGH, testosterone, and IGF-1, than if you were to stick to the same body part supersetting you’re probably used to.

The release of these chemicals does wonders for those wanting to add lean muscle mass to their frames.  As an added bonus, the fat burning effects of EPOC (which you will experience if you are maintaining the right intensity between upper/lower body movements) is going to shred you up at the same time.  No more weight training PLUS cardio days at the gym.  Knock it all out in one intense workout.

To get the full benefits from this type of training, make sure you go heavy on the weights.  Aim for 6-8 reps per exercise and use compound movements whenever possible.  A good full-body routine would include the following:

  • Wide Grip Pullups supersetted with Pushups
  • Military Press supersetted with Deadlifts
  • Bench Press supersetted with Barbell Squats
  • Close Grip Bench Press supersetted with Barbell Clean and Press
  • Dumbbell Snatch supersetted with Box Jumps

 

In closing, standard isolation exercises, long and low-intensity cardio, and long rest periods are great for bodybuilders.  However, the fact is, 99.9% of you aren’t bodybuilders.  You’re regular people who simply want to add muscle, lose fat, and look great under your clothes.  Long, lean, and athletic.    I know exactly how you feel. In order to look that way, you must train that way.  Get yourself in gear and begin using the methods laid out in this article.  Stay tuned, because our next write-up is going to feature more advanced technique which combines all three methods into one insane workout.  Happy lifting!

A Brand New Life with 3 Easy Tips

1. Eat 8 ounces of food every 3 hours

2. No sugary drinks

3. Do not skip meals.

The result for Anita Mills? 

A weight loss of 232 pounds.

Weight loss can be so simple! There is no need to over think it.  Anna never deprived herself of her favorite foods, she merely showed self-control and only ate what she alloted for herself in that meal.  If she went out to eat, she would order a doggie bag right away to save half her meal.  After a few months into Anita’s new diet, her body started craving healthy foods. Diet is where 85% of weight loss comes from, add some exercise with your healthy diet and you are good to go. Anita never went crazy with her workouts.  She walked about 5 times a week and also engaged in some light cardio.

Anita is loving every minute of her new healthy, thinner life.  She is trying new things that she never thought were possible.

It took a trip to the doctor with Anita’s diabetic mother for her to realize it was time for a change. She was finally ready and determined to improve her life.  She snapped a picture of herself and saved it on her phone.  That picture was the first step Anita took in holding herself accountable for her weight loss journey. 

Don’t wait until it’s too late. Commit to a healthy lifestyle today.

Check out the full story here.

Body Diversity Training: The Key to Lifelong Health and Well-Being

First off, this is not another article where I rant and rave about the benefits of muscle confusion.  For those of you that may not follow this blog religiously, I often preach the importance of confusing your muscles during any long-term weight training program.  The reasoning behind this is muscle confusion is a sure-fire way to keep your muscles on their toes, and helps you avoid the dreaded plateaus. 

Body diversity, which does draw on some ideas of the muscle confusion theory,  is so much more than that.  Simply changing up weights, exercises, and the manner in which we lift weights is great for individuals trying to continue gaining strength and adding muscle mass.  Adding muscle mass is great because it will help speed up your metabolism, but unlocking total body health and wellness is about more than just adding muscle and increasing your metabolism.

While working as a personal trainer several years ago I would regularly come across three different type of clients.  Client A was the person who simply wanted to hit the weights and pack on muscle.  Client B was the person who wanted to lose weight and thought doing as much running as possible was the best way to achieve that goal. Client C was the person who did a little bit of everything; weight training, yoga, biking, bootcamp classes, pilates, etc.  Client C lifted less often than Client A and did less overall cardio than Client B, but you know what?  Client C was by FAR the most fit of the bunch.   

Now, I already know what most of you are thinking.  ‘First, how do I have time to bike, take cardio classes, take yoga classes, do pilates, AND lift weights?  Second, how do I afford to take all these classes?  Achieving a fit lifestyle must only be for the well off.’  My goal, and the reason I started Share It Fitness was to show that reaching your fitness goals wasn’t about spending massive amounts of time or money in gyms and studios.

Body Diversity Training is the foundation that Share It Fitness was built.  We wanted to create a database of full-length exercise and fitness classes that was bigger and more robust than anything that could be found on the internet.  Imagine being able to wake up on Monday and take a yoga class focusing on cardio training  from your living room, then hit the gym after work for some weight training with a workout specifically designed for you by one of our live professionals.  Tuesday, maybe you are taking a cardio based class with light dumbbells from home.  Wednesday you do a plyometric class in your backyard while following along with the instructor leading the class.  Thursday, you’re back in the gym, but your taking a 60 second interval training class  instead of doing the same boring routine you’ve always done.  Friday, you decide to take an early morning relaxation yoga class to start your day.  That evening, you decide you want to get some mat pilates in, so you fire up a class and get your workout in right in front of the TV in your living room.  You get the idea.

This is Body Diversity Training.  By incorporating many different disciplines of fitness into your life, you are hitting your muscles, cardiovascular system, and mind in a way it has never experienced before.  This ever-changing fitness lifestyle throws your body into disarray.  You are going to force your body to grow, build, and become stronger.  Your mental well-being should also improve as a result.  We are going for the total body make-over, not just the physical aspect.  Not only will you look better from the outside, your internal organs are going to function better, and you will likely receive the mental benefits that come with gaining and maintaining a lean body and a healthy and happy lifestyle.

Our muscles stand to benefit by being hit from various angles, in different formats, and with varying weights.  Our cardiovascular system stands to benefit by the varying amounts and intensities of cardio we are doing.  By combining different types of cardio into your lifestyle, you will exponentially increase your CV ability and strength.  Doing the same running routine over and over not only gets old, but loses its effectiveness over time.  Keep things fresh by trying lots of different classes that keep you moving and sweating.  Classes on Share It Fitness were systematically designed for individuals of all levels.  What this means is that you can progressively take harder and harder classes as your fitness levels progress.  We have workouts designed by, and for, professional athletes that are down right HARD.  We have workouts geared towards absolute beginners.  Progressively up the difficult in your routines, and you will experience the full benefits of Body Diversity Training. 

With the concerns I know many of you have in mind, we created our website to eliminate the most common excuses.  Time: Our classes range from 10-90 minutes in length.  Find something that works for you, and do it.  Something else to keep in mind, many of these classes can be done at home.  Save time by not driving to and from the gym.  This is fitness on your own time schedule.  Price: taking 7 different fitness classes a week could add up to almost a thousand dollars a month if you were to do this in studios, gyms, etc.  Share It Fitness has brought the studio, gym, etc. to you.  For the price of a large iced coffee at Starbucks, you have access to hundreds and hundreds of full-length health and fitness classes.  That yoga studio, pilates studio, personal training gym, etc. is now at your fingertips, wherever you may be.

Exercise and Calories Burned Per Hour

Exercise & Calories Burned per Hour
130 lbs
155 lbs
180 lbs
205 lbs
Aerobics, general
384
457
531
605
Aerobics, high impact
413
493
572
651
Aerobics, low impact
295
352
409
465
Aerobics, step aerobics
502
598
695
791
Archery
207
246
286
326
Backpacking, Hiking with pack
413
493
572
651
Badminton
266
317
368
419
Bagging grass, leaves
236
281
327
372
Bakery, light effort
148
176
204
233
Ballet, twist, jazz, tap
266
317
368
419
Ballroom dancing, fast
325
387
449
512
Ballroom dancing, slow
177
211
245
279
Basketball game, competitive
472
563
654
745
Basketball, playing, non game
354
422
490
558
Basketball, shooting baskets
266
317
368
419
Basketball, wheelchair
384
457
531
605
Bathing dog
207
246
286
326
Bird watching
148
176
204
233
Boating, power, speed boat
148
176
204
233
Bowling
177
211
245
279
Boxing, in ring
708
844
981
1117
Boxing, punching bag
354
422
490
558
Boxing, sparring
531
633
735
838
Calisthenics, light, pushups, situps…
207
246
286
326
Calisthenics, fast, pushups, situps…
472
563
654
745
Canoeing, camping trip
236
281
327
372
Canoeing, rowing, light
177
211
245
279
Canoeing, rowing, moderate
413
493
572
651
Canoeing, rowing, vigorous
708
844
981
1117
Carpentry, general
207
246
286
326
Carrying 16 to 24 lbs, upstairs
354
422
490
558
Carrying 25 to 49 lbs, upstairs
472
563
654
745
Carrying heavy loads
472
563
654
745
Carrying infant, level ground
207
246
286
326
Carrying infant, upstairs
295
352
409
465
Carrying moderate loads upstairs
472
563
654
745
Carrying small children
177
211
245
279
Children’s games, hopscotch…
295
352
409
465
Circuit training, minimal rest
472
563
654
745
Cleaning gutters
295
352
409
465
Cleaning, dusting
148
176
204
233
Climbing hills, carrying up to 9 lbs
413
493
572
651
Climbing hills, carrying 10 to 20 lb
443
528
613
698
Climbing hills, carrying 21 to 42 lb
472
563
654
745
Climbing hills, carrying over 42 lb
531
633
735
838
Coaching: football,basketball,soccer
236
281
327
372
Coal mining, general
354
422
490
558
Construction, exterior, remodeling
325
387
449
512
Crew, sculling, rowing, competition
708
844
981
1117
Cricket (batting, bowling)
295
352
409
465
Croquet
148
176
204
233
Cross country snow skiing, slow
413
493
572
651
Cross country skiing, moderate
472
563
654
745
Cross country skiing, racing
826
985
1144
1303
Cross country skiing, uphill
974
1161
1348
1536
Cross country skiing, vigorous
531
633
735
838
Curling
236
281
327
372
Cycling, <10mph, leisure bicycling
236
281
327
372
Cycling, >20mph, racing
944
1126
1308
1489
Cycling, 10-11.9mph, light
354
422
490
558
Cycling, 12-13.9mph, moderate
472
563
654
745
Cycling, 14-15.9mph, vigorous
590
704
817
931
Cycling, 16-19mph, very fast, racing
708
844
981
1117
Cycling, mountain bike, bmx
502
598
695
791
Darts (wall or lawn)
148
176
204
233
Diving, springboard or platform
177
211
245
279
Downhill snow skiing, moderate
354
422
490
558
Downhill snow skiing, racing
472
563
654
745
Electrical work, plumbing
207
246
286
326
Farming, baling hay, cleaning barn
472
563
654
745
Farming, chasing cattle on horseback
236
281
327
372
Farming, feeding horses or cattle
266
317
368
419
Farming, feeding small animals
236
281
327
372
Farming, grooming animals
354
422
490
558
Fencing
354
422
490
558
Fire fighter, climbing ladder, full gear
649
774
899
1024
Fire fighter, hauling hoses on ground
472
563
654
745
Fishing from boat, sitting
148
176
204
233
Fishing from riverbank, standing
207
246
286
326
Fishing from riverbank, walking
236
281
327
372
Fishing in stream, in waders
354
422
490
558
Fishing, general
177
211
245
279
Fishing, ice fishing
118
141
163
186
Flying airplane (pilot)
118
141
163
186
Football or baseball, playing catch
148
176
204
233
Football, competitive
531
633
735
838
Football, touch, flag, general
472
563
654
745
Forestry, ax chopping, fast
1003
1196
1389
1582
Forestry, ax chopping, slow
295
352
409
465
Forestry, carrying logs
649
774
899
1024
Forestry, sawing by hand
413
493
572
651
Forestry, trimming trees
531
633
735
838
Frisbee playing, general
177
211
245
279
Frisbee, ultimate frisbee
472
563
654
745
Gardening, general
236
281
327
372
General cleaning
207
246
286
326
Golf, driving range
177
211
245
279
Golf, general
266
317
368
419
Golf, miniature golf
177
211
245
279
Golf, using power cart
207
246
286
326
Golf, walking and pulling clubs
254
303
351
400
Golf, walking and carrying clubs
266
317
368
419
Gymnastics
236
281
327
372
Hacky sack
236
281
327
372
Handball
708
844
981
1117
Handball, team
472
563
654
745
Health club exercise
325
387
449
512
Hiking, cross country
354
422
490
558
Hockey, field hockey
472
563
654
745
Hockey, ice hockey
472
563
654
745
Horesback riding, saddling horse
207
246
286
326
Horse grooming
354
422
490
558
Horse racing, galloping
472
563
654
745
Horse racing, trotting
384
457
531
605
Horse racing, walking
153
183
212
242
Horseback riding
236
281
327
372
Horseback riding, grooming horse
207
246
286
326
Horseback riding, trotting
384
457
531
605
Horseback riding, walking
148
176
204
233
Horseshoe pitching
177
211
245
279
Housework, light
148
176
204
233
Housework, moderate
207
246
286
326
Housework, vigorous
236
281
327
372
Hunting, general
295
352
409
465
Hunting, large game
354
422
490
558
Hunting, small game
295
352
409
465
Ice skating, < 9 mph
325
387
449
512
Ice skating, average speed
413
493
572
651
Ice skating, rapidly
531
633
735
838
Instructing aerobic class
354
422
490
558
Jai alai
708
844
981
1117
Jazzercise
354
422
490
558
Judo, karate, jujitsu, martial arts
590
704
817
931
Juggling
236
281
327
372
Jumping rope, fast
708
844
981
1117
Jumping rope, moderate
590
704
817
931
Jumping rope, slow
472
563
654
745
Kayaking
295
352
409
465
Kick boxing
590
704
817
931
Kickball
413
493
572
651
Krav maga class
590
704
817
931
Lacrosse
472
563
654
745
Loading, unloading car
177
211
245
279
Machine tooling, sheet metal
148
176
204
233
Machine tooling, tapping, drilling
236
281
327
372
Marching band, playing instrument
236
281
327
372
Marching, rapidly, military
384
457
531
605
Masonry, concrete
413
493
572
651
Masseur, masseuse, standing
236
281
327
372
Mild stretching
148
176
204
233
Moving heavy objects, moving van
443
528
613
698
Mowing lawn, riding mower
148
176
204
233
Mowing lawn, walk, power mower
325
387
449
512
Music, playing a cello
118
141
163
186
Music, playing drums
236
281
327
372
Music, playing guitar
177
211
245
279
Music, playing piano
148
176
204
233
Music, playing trombone
207
246
286
326
Music, playing trumpet
148
176
204
233
Music, playing violin
148
176
204
233
Nursing, patient care
177
211
245
279
Orienteering
531
633
735
838
Paddle boat
236
281
327
372
Paddleball, competitive
590
704
817
931
Paddleball, playing
354
422
490
558
Painting
266
317
368
419
Pistol shooting, trap shooting, range
148
176
204
233
Playing pool, billiards
148
176
204
233
Police, directing traffic, standing
148
176
204
233
Police, making an arrest
236
281
327
372
Polo
472
563
654
745
Pushing a wheelchair
236
281
327
372
Pushing plane in and out of hanger
354
422
490
558
Pushing stroller, walking with children
148
176
204
233
Race walking
384
457
531
605
Racquetball, competitive
590
704
817
931
Racquetball, playing
413
493
572
651
Raking lawn
254
303
351
400
Riding motorcyle
148
176
204
233
Riding, snow blower
177
211
245
279
Rock climbing, ascending rock
649
774
899
1024
Rock climbing, mountain climbing
472
563
654
745
Rock climbing, rappelling
472
563
654
745
Roller blading, in-line skating
708
844
981
1117
Roller skating
413
493
572
651
Rowing machine, light
207
246
286
326
Rowing machine, moderate
413
493
572
651
Rowing machine, very vigorous
708
844
981
1117
Rowing machine, vigorous
502
598
695
791
Rugby
590
704
817
931
Running, 5 mph (12 minute mile)
472
563
654
745
Running, 5.2 mph (11.5 minute mile)
531
633
735
838
Running, 6 mph (10 min mile)
590
704
817
931
Running, 6.7 mph (9 min mile)
649
774
899
1024
Running, 7 mph (8.5 min mile)
679
809
940
1070
Running, 7.5mph (8 min mile)
738
880
1022
1163
Running, 8 mph (7.5 min mile)
797
950
1103
1256
Running, 8.6 mph (7 min mile)
826
985
1144
1303
Running, 9 mph (6.5 min mile)
885
1056
1226
1396
Running, 10 mph (6 min mile)
944
1126
1308
1489
Running, 10.9 mph (5.5 min mile)
1062
1267
1471
1675
Running, cross country
531
633
735
838
Running, general
472
563
654
745
Running, on a track, team practice
590
704
817
931
Running, stairs, up
885
1056
1226
1396
Running, training, pushing wheelchair
472
563
654
745
Sailing, competition
295
352
409
465
Sailing, yachting, ocean sailing
177
211
245
279
Shoveling snow by hand
354
422
490
558
Shoveling, digging ditches
502
598
695
791
Shuffleboard, lawn bowling
177
211
245
279
Sit, playing with animals, light
148
176
204
233
Sitting, light office work
89
106
123
140
Skateboarding
295
352
409
465
Ski machine
413
493
572
651
Ski mobiling
413
493
572
651
Skiing, water skiing
354
422
490
558
Skin diving, fast
944
1126
1308
1489
Skin diving, moderate
738
880
1022
1163
Skin diving, scuba diving
413
493
572
651
Skindiving or scuba diving
708
844
981
1117
Sky diving
177
211
245
279
Sledding, tobagganing, luge
413
493
572
651
Snorkeling
295
352
409
465
Snow shoeing
472
563
654
745
Snow skiing, downhill skiing, light
295
352
409
465
Snowmobiling
207
246
286
326
Soccer, competitive
590
704
817
931
Soccer, playing
413
493
572
651
Softball or baseball
295
352
409
465
Softball, officiating
236
281
327
372
Softball, pitching
354
422
490
558
Speed skating, ice, competitive
885
1056
1226
1396
Squash
708
844
981
1117
Stair machine
531
633
735
838
Standing, bartending, store clerk
136
162
188
214
Standing, playing with children, light
165
197
229
261
Stationary cycling, light
325
387
449
512
Stationary cycling, moderate
413
493
572
651
Stationary cycling, very light
177
211
245
279
Stationary cycling, very vigorous
738
880
1022
1163
Stationary cycling, vigorous
620
739
858
977
Steel mill, working in general
472
563
654
745
Stretching, hatha yoga
236
281
327
372
Surfing, body surfing or board surfing
177
211
245
279
Swimming backstroke
413
493
572
651
Swimming breaststroke
590
704
817
931
Swimming butterfly
649
774
899
1024
Swimming laps, freestyle, fast
590
704
817
931
Swimming laps, freestyle, slow
413
493
572
651
Swimming leisurely, not laps
354
422
490
558
Swimming sidestroke
472
563
654
745
Swimming synchronized
472
563
654
745
Swimming, treading water, fast
590
704
817
931
Swimming, treading water, moderate
236
281
327
372
Table tennis, ping pong
236
281
327
372
Tae kwan do, martial arts
590
704
817
931
Tai chi
236
281
327
372
Tailoring, general
148
176
204
233
Taking out trash
177
211
245
279
Teach exercise class (& participate)
384
457
531
605
Teach physical education class
236
281
327
372
Tennis playing
413
493
572
651
Tennis, doubles
354
422
490
558
Tennis, singles
472
563
654
745
Track and field (high jump, pole vault)
354
422
490
558
Track and field (hurdles)
590
704
817
931
Track and field (shot, discus)
236
281
327
372
Trampoline
207
246
286
326
Truck driving, loading,unloading truck
384
457
531
605
Typing, computer data entry
89
106
123
140
Unicycling
295
352
409
465
Using crutches
295
352
409
465
Volleyball playing
177
211
245
279
Volleyball, beach
472
563
654
745
Volleyball, competitive
472
563
654
745
Walk / run, playing, moderate
236
281
327
372
Walk / run, playing, vigorous
295
352
409
465
Walking 2.0 mph, slow
148
176
204
233
Walking 2.5 mph
177
211
245
279
Walking 3.0 mph, moderate
195
232
270
307
Walking 3.5 mph, brisk pace
224
267
311
354
Walking 3.5 mph, uphill
354
422
490
558
Walking 4.0 mph, very brisk
295
352
409
465
Walking 4.5 mph
372
443
515
586
Walking 5.0 mph
472
563
654
745
Walking downstairs
177
211
245
279
Walking the dog
177
211
245
279
Walking, pushing a wheelchair
236
281
327
372
Walking, snow blower
207
246
286
326
Walking, under 2.0 mph, very slow
118
141
163
186
Wallyball
413
493
572
651
Water aerobics
236
281
327
372
Water aerobics, water calisthenics
236
281
327
372
Water jogging
472
563
654
745
Water polo
590
704
817
931
Water volleyball
177
211
245
279
Watering lawn or garden
89
106
123
140
Weeding, cultivating garden
266
317
368
419
Weight lifting, body building, vigorous
354
422
490
558
Weight lifting, light workout
177
211
245
279
Whitewater rafting, kayaking,canoeing
295
352
409
465
Windsurfing, sailing
177
211
245
279
Wrestling
354
422
490
558

Celebrities Struggle with Their Weight Too!

Though she seems to have it all—fame, fortune and a happy marriage—fun-loving reality star Khloe Kardashian admits that she has her struggles like everyone else, especially when it comes to body image.

“My weight is always going up and down. I’m always fighting that, and I feel like no matter what I do, I never look good enough to everybody else,” Kardashian, 26, admits in a video Q&A on her blog. “But that’s been a struggle that I think I’ve gotten a hold of, not caring what other people think. Now I just have my body to how I like it.”

Despite feeling more comfortable in her skin, Kardashian says she isn’t immune to being constantly compared to sisters Kim, 30, and Kourtney, 31, and the speculation that she’s pregnant any time she puts on a pound.

“Other people’s words eventually do come and hit you hard,” she says. “My weight is my biggest lifetime struggle. It’s not the biggest thing in life, but it does get you down sometimes.”

The Marquee Blog

Hillary Duff’s Happy, Healthy New Shape

Hillary Duff shares her healthy ways with Health.com.  Here is one celebrity setting a good example (unlike some) who has a lifestyle that you can mirror for a healthier you!

Don’t let the “former teen star” description fool you: Hilary Duff is one young celeb who truly has it together. You won’t find the ex-Lizzie McGuire star landing in the tabloids because of hard-partying ways.

Instead, the 23-year-old actress/singer has made headlines by getting married (to pro hockey player Mike Comrie) and adding to her ridiculously impressive resume: In October, the actress/singer released her first book, a young-adult novel called “Elixir.” Here, Hilary chats with Health about what she loves about writing, which workout she swears by, and her hard-earned secret to body confidence.

Q: What’s your definition of living healthy?

A: Moderation is key. Eating healthily all the time can be boring — you know, when you take apart the menu and ask for everything on the side?

Balance makes me feel good: I feel most healthy when I enjoy small bites of the things I love. I used to feel bad about eating French fries — I’d think that I had blown my diet. But you have to think, That’s OK, I’ll eat healthier tomorrow.

Q: What are your favorite good-for-you snacks?

A: Recently, I have been eating a lot of vegetables and hummus and fruit — stuff I never really liked before. If I am hungry before bed, I will grab a handful of blueberries. Greek yogurt is one of my favorite things in the whole world.

Sometimes I’ll chop up a bunch of veggies and put them in a food processor with Greek yogurt and make a dip. It’s better if I snack throughout the day, because if I get hungry, Mike says I get “hangry,” which is hungry-angry. It’s not good.

Q: Do you have any guilty-pleasure foods?

A: I love cheese. I would probably eat any kind you put in front of me! And I like healthy things with a high fat content, like dark chocolate and avocado.

Q: You’re into Pilates, right?

A: I was a gymnast when I was little, so I think Pilates is really important to helping me stay long and lean. I try to do it three times a week. I also do circuit training. Before I wasn’t doing much cardio — just Pilates — and I wasn’t getting the same results, so I bumped up my cardio and do circuits probably twice a week.

Q: You intensified your workouts (with trainer Harley Pasternak) before your August wedding. Have you kept that up?

A: I was kind of burned out afterward, so I relaxed a bit, but now I am starting to feel the effects. I probably won’t be as hard on myself, but I do want to stay on top of it. It’s a constant battle.

Q: What are your tricks for making workouts fun?

A: Making sure I work out with people I can talk to. Sometimes my sister [Haylie] and I will work out together, and we laugh the whole time, so it goes by faster. I can also read a script or book while on the elliptical. I joke with Mike that I have better than 20-20 vision.

Q: Do you have any health regrets?

A: I got pretty skinny when I was between 17 and 19. I don’t know what exactly made me get on that kick, but at the time I was starting to become aware of what people said about me and how I looked in pictures. I literally ate nothing but steamed vegetables and broiled or grilled chicken, with nothing else.

I was touring at the time, traveling everywhere, and I felt so run down. Not giving your body enough of what it needs is really dangerous. I regret it because I don’t think I was happy then.

Q: You endured scrutiny about your weight when you were still a teenager. How did you handle that?

A: It sucked. I was 16 and my body was still changing and people would say I was too heavy. And then I would lose weight and my face would get skinny and people would say I had done something to my face and that I was too skinny.

It must have been really hard because I’ve blocked it out a little. At the time, I felt almost proud of being skinny, but one day the mother of a fan came up to me and said, “Are you OK? Are they not feeding you?”

After that, all of a sudden, I stopped being as concerned about everything. It wasn’t a big intervention or anything. I got off tour and changed. I started hanging out with my friends and cooking and had a more normal life.

Q: You seem comfortable in your own skin now. What’s the key to body confidence?

A: I have issues and insecurities just like everybody else. It really helps to have a partner that loves everything about you and makes you feel really beautiful. Not that you should look for other people to make you feel good about yourself, but it does help.

Other than that, I really do feel like working out has helped because you’re working hard for something. You feel stronger and a little more powerful. There’s no trick, though. I hate my arms. Nobody is ever perfect, but it helps to look for things to feel good about, rather than things to feel bad about.

Q: Your first novel, “Elixir,” came out in October. What made you want to write a young-adult book?

A: It was a few years ago, and I asked myself, “What do I want to do? How can I spend time with Mike?” I wanted to be able to reach out to my fans, and writing was something creative I could do, even when I was traveling with him.

Q: After releasing four albums, you put your music career on hold. Think you’ll return to the studio?

A: I want to act. That is what I want to focus on more, but it’s all about timing and finding the right role.

Q: Did any of the older Disney alums give you advice when you were starting out?

A: I think people imagine it that way, that you have these deep conversations about how to manage your way through this craziness. I’ve met Justin [Timberlake] and Britney [Spears] a few times, but it’s not like they’ve said, “Here, sit down, listen to me kid.”

Q: You filmed a threesome scene on “Gossip Girl” last season. What was that like?

A: I went into my wardrobe fitting one day and was trying on lingerie. I asked them why I was trying on so much lingerie, and they were like, “Oh, you don’t know? You’re having a threesome scene.” My first thought was, “How am I going to tell my mother?”

Q: How have things changed between you and Mike since getting married?

A: I think we already felt married before we were married because we had a really strong commitment to each other. I did feel different after the wedding, going through the steps and saying those words to one another, but now things have settled down and gone back to normal.

Q: Do you have special plans for your first Thanksgiving as newlyweds?

A: For the last few years [Mike] has been in Canada and they do Thanksgiving on a different day. I don’t know if my mom is going to come or where we’ll be.

But I love to bake! On Thanksgiving, I make pecan pie and pumpkin pie. Before the wedding I was baking all the time and giving it away and my friends were like, “We know what you are doing — you are making us eat it [so you don’t eat it]. This is mean!”

The 7 best fat-blasters

Health.com posted a great list of the best fat blasters.  I recommend going with the extra burn each time!! You can’t beat intervals with high intensity.  Remember, the more effort you put in…the more results you will see.

1. Inline skating
Burns 425 calories in 30 minutes

Surprised? While skating might be so much fun you forget you’re actually working out, it’s also numero uno on our list when it comes to blasting fat and calories.

The big burn stems from the side-to-side movement of your thigh and butt muscles (demanding more from your body than the straightforward motion of our number-two activity — running). And your core gets involved in a big way to keep you balanced.

What’s more, you get all these benefits without putting too much stress on your knees and other joints. Skate at a strong, steady pace. Don’t forget your helmet, wrist guards, and knee and elbow pads.

Boost the burn: Alternate one minute of hard skating with one minute of medium-paced strokes.

2. Running
Burns 374 calories in 30 minutes

The typical runner’s shape is sleek and lean, and there’s a reason for that: The major running muscles — legs, butt, core — happen to be the biggest calorie-and-fat-burning muscles in your body.

To get the most out of each stride, swing your arms close to your body, don’t lean forward, and keep your feet low to the ground. To lessen impact, land on the middle of your foot, then roll through to your toes.

Boost the burn: Alternate fast and slow intervals, or take to the hills.

3. Jumping rope
Burns 340 calories in 30 minutes

You knew this workout had to be high on the list. After all, it’s one of pro boxers’ favorite ways to train.

To get the most from each jump, use a rope with handles that reach to just under your armpits when you stand on the middle of it, and follow these top-form tips: Jump with your feet slightly apart and body upright, and keep your jumps low to the ground. Don’t have a rope? You’ll get the same benefits by doing the movements rope-free.

Boost the burn: Frequently switch up your speed (slow, fast) and style (jumping with one foot, then two feet), or jump rope while you jog.

4. Hula hooping
Burns 300 calories in 30 minutes

There’s a reason Marisa Tomei and Beyoncé hoop to keep their bodies beautiful — it’s a major fat-and-calorie torcher. To do it yourself, grab an adult-sized hoop (they’re larger and heavier than kids’ hoops, making them easier to spin); you’ll know you have the right size if it reaches your chest when you stand it up in front of you.

No fancy moves required, either. Simply keep it going around your waist. To start, stand with one foot in front of the other and shift your weight back and forth (versus around in a circle). And don’t worry if you’re less than perfect at first; you’ll still knock off major calories, plus get better every time you spin.

Boost the burn: Get how-tos for advanced moves and a fun workout at Health.com/hula-hoop.

5. Tennis
Burns 272 calories in 30 minutes

Don’t think you need to round up a partner or trek all the way to a court to break a super sweat with racket in hand. (Though if you have a pal and a nearby net, you’ll burn the same calories.) Simply find a flat area near a wall or garage door that you can hit the ball against.

Alternate forehand and backhand shots — then see how many you can do in a row without goofing. Stand 10 to 25 feet away, which will force you to hit harder. Even practicing your serve will get your body in burn mode, because you’ll have to run and bend to pick up your missed balls.

Boost the burn: Try to hit the ball consistently for 50 or 100 strokes. “Having a goal will make you work harder to reach it,” Braganza says.

6. Dancing
Burns 221 calories in 30 minutes

This may not be the biggest calorie-burner in the bunch, but it’s still an excellent — and fun! — metabolism booster. (Just look at Kelly Osbourne, who jump-started her amazing 42-pound loss on Dancing with the Stars.)

The key is to keep the tempo high, choosing songs with fast rhythms like Latin or Bollywood, and don’t rest between songs.

Try Braganza’s favorite trick: Download a workout’s worth of your favorite tunes. Begin with an upbeat inspirational song think “Just Dance” by Lady Gaga, then move on to songs with increasingly faster tempos. Slow the beat toward the end to cool down.

Boost the burn: Use your arms! Raise them in the air and move them to the beat.

7. Walking vigorously
Burns 170 calories in 30 minutes

That’s right, walking actually made our list. Full disclosure, though: A leisurely stroll with a friend won’t cut it. You should be walking briskly enough that it’s difficult to keep up a steady conversation.

To get the most from your biggest calorie-burning muscles — legs, butt, and core — take short, quick steps, keep your torso upright, and pump your arms back and forth (not side to side) in time with your stride. With each step, land on your heel and roll through to your toes.

Boost the burn: Alternate two minutes of brisk strides with one minute of as-fast-as-you-can-go walking (or jogging).

7 Subconscious Slimming Strategies

How many of us haven’t yet figured out that broccoli is generally a better choice than a Big Mac? The challenge for most isn’t in knowing what we should do to lose weight, but rather in actually doing it. Enjoy these seven strategies that will help you enjoyably do what you already know you should.

1. Focus on the Solution, not the Problem

There is a Huna saying (Huna is the spiritual practice of the traditional Hawaiian culture) that goes “Energy goes where attention flows”. In other words, what you think about expands. If you are constantly thinking about what you don’t want, you will have more of it. The subconscious mind does not understand a negative command. So if I were to say “don’t think of a pink elephant with purple spots on its floppy ears right now” what do you think about? If you tell yourself “don’t eat”, what do you think you will want to do?

Consider focusing on what you do want instead. For example, “I want to be relaxed around food” or “I want to love to exercise”. The energy will happily flow to the solution, and your subconscious mind will begin to design ways to get you what you want.

2. Recognize the Positive Intent

We overeat for a reason, and the reason, believe it or not, isn’t self-torture. We all prefer pleasure over pain, and let’s face it, you’re getting some pleasure out of overeating, or you wouldn’t do it. Perhaps it’s the distraction, the taste, or the comfort.

Whatever the reason, notice that, in its essence, it’s positive. Then begin to design new behaviors and thought patterns that work even better than food. For example, if food is a distraction, what are you distracting yourself from? How could you enjoy that more?

3. Whisper Sweet Things to Yourself

How do you talk to yourself? Would you speak to a friend or a child in this way? If you did, how would it affect them? Just for fun, pretend you are your own best friend, and say the nicest, most supportive things you can imagine to yourself. Switch to “I feel good about myself” or even “I am so silly!” from your top ten self criticisms and watch your sweet words replace your sweet tooth.

4. Focus on Self-Correcting.

No matter what your resolve, no matter how miraculous the diet, you will overeat again. We know this because naturally slender people overeat from time to time. Sometimes they misjudge how filling their food will be, other times they make a conscious choice to do it. But it doesn’t matter. They are still naturally slender.

The difference is that the naturally slender self correct. They know how to bring themselves back into balance after over-indulging. So if they dip their chips a few too many times at a cocktail party, they eat less at dinner. If they become upset emotionally, they get the support they need before coping with food or drink.

Shift your focus to how you bring yourself back into balance after overindulging, and on decreasing the time it takes to do so. Whether it’s a walk in nature, a workout, or a talk with a friend that brings you back into balance, make self-correcting your new priority.

5. Change Your Definition of Success

If you have set a goal for yourself of reaching a certain weight, it will probably take some time before you reach that goal. And along the way, the scale may not always tell you what you want to hear.

Because it’s hard to stay motivated for a long term goal that involves short term “sacrifice”, consider changing your goal to something that you can be successful at every day, such as making a healthy choice, or self-correcting.

6. Persistence not Perfection.

We love to strive for perfection, with the idea that in striving we will be our best. Unfortunately, this strategy often backfires when we beat ourselves up for not being good enough, heading straight to the refrigerator for consolation.

Reward yourself instead for your persistent efforts – for your commitment to learning, for self correcting, or for saying sweet things to yourself. Recognize that progress happens in waves, where the troughs are just as important as the crests in moving forward.

7. Create a Learning Mind.

As humans, we love to learn, be it finding the quickest route to work or the easiest way to get the job done. Yet many of us get stuck when it comes to changing our eating patterns. We fail to learn new, better strategies, getting stuck in our old patterns.

Why? Because we ask questions that block our natural learning, like “Why do I keep doing this? “What’s wrong with me?” or “I’ll never change.”

What if we asked ourselves learning questions instead, like “How would I like to be next time?”, “What is there to learn from this situation?” or “How can I make this easier?”.

The Renee Method

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