Archive for January, 2011|Monthly archive page

Exercise and Calories Burned Per Hour

Exercise & Calories Burned per Hour
130 lbs
155 lbs
180 lbs
205 lbs
Aerobics, general
384
457
531
605
Aerobics, high impact
413
493
572
651
Aerobics, low impact
295
352
409
465
Aerobics, step aerobics
502
598
695
791
Archery
207
246
286
326
Backpacking, Hiking with pack
413
493
572
651
Badminton
266
317
368
419
Bagging grass, leaves
236
281
327
372
Bakery, light effort
148
176
204
233
Ballet, twist, jazz, tap
266
317
368
419
Ballroom dancing, fast
325
387
449
512
Ballroom dancing, slow
177
211
245
279
Basketball game, competitive
472
563
654
745
Basketball, playing, non game
354
422
490
558
Basketball, shooting baskets
266
317
368
419
Basketball, wheelchair
384
457
531
605
Bathing dog
207
246
286
326
Bird watching
148
176
204
233
Boating, power, speed boat
148
176
204
233
Bowling
177
211
245
279
Boxing, in ring
708
844
981
1117
Boxing, punching bag
354
422
490
558
Boxing, sparring
531
633
735
838
Calisthenics, light, pushups, situps…
207
246
286
326
Calisthenics, fast, pushups, situps…
472
563
654
745
Canoeing, camping trip
236
281
327
372
Canoeing, rowing, light
177
211
245
279
Canoeing, rowing, moderate
413
493
572
651
Canoeing, rowing, vigorous
708
844
981
1117
Carpentry, general
207
246
286
326
Carrying 16 to 24 lbs, upstairs
354
422
490
558
Carrying 25 to 49 lbs, upstairs
472
563
654
745
Carrying heavy loads
472
563
654
745
Carrying infant, level ground
207
246
286
326
Carrying infant, upstairs
295
352
409
465
Carrying moderate loads upstairs
472
563
654
745
Carrying small children
177
211
245
279
Children’s games, hopscotch…
295
352
409
465
Circuit training, minimal rest
472
563
654
745
Cleaning gutters
295
352
409
465
Cleaning, dusting
148
176
204
233
Climbing hills, carrying up to 9 lbs
413
493
572
651
Climbing hills, carrying 10 to 20 lb
443
528
613
698
Climbing hills, carrying 21 to 42 lb
472
563
654
745
Climbing hills, carrying over 42 lb
531
633
735
838
Coaching: football,basketball,soccer
236
281
327
372
Coal mining, general
354
422
490
558
Construction, exterior, remodeling
325
387
449
512
Crew, sculling, rowing, competition
708
844
981
1117
Cricket (batting, bowling)
295
352
409
465
Croquet
148
176
204
233
Cross country snow skiing, slow
413
493
572
651
Cross country skiing, moderate
472
563
654
745
Cross country skiing, racing
826
985
1144
1303
Cross country skiing, uphill
974
1161
1348
1536
Cross country skiing, vigorous
531
633
735
838
Curling
236
281
327
372
Cycling, <10mph, leisure bicycling
236
281
327
372
Cycling, >20mph, racing
944
1126
1308
1489
Cycling, 10-11.9mph, light
354
422
490
558
Cycling, 12-13.9mph, moderate
472
563
654
745
Cycling, 14-15.9mph, vigorous
590
704
817
931
Cycling, 16-19mph, very fast, racing
708
844
981
1117
Cycling, mountain bike, bmx
502
598
695
791
Darts (wall or lawn)
148
176
204
233
Diving, springboard or platform
177
211
245
279
Downhill snow skiing, moderate
354
422
490
558
Downhill snow skiing, racing
472
563
654
745
Electrical work, plumbing
207
246
286
326
Farming, baling hay, cleaning barn
472
563
654
745
Farming, chasing cattle on horseback
236
281
327
372
Farming, feeding horses or cattle
266
317
368
419
Farming, feeding small animals
236
281
327
372
Farming, grooming animals
354
422
490
558
Fencing
354
422
490
558
Fire fighter, climbing ladder, full gear
649
774
899
1024
Fire fighter, hauling hoses on ground
472
563
654
745
Fishing from boat, sitting
148
176
204
233
Fishing from riverbank, standing
207
246
286
326
Fishing from riverbank, walking
236
281
327
372
Fishing in stream, in waders
354
422
490
558
Fishing, general
177
211
245
279
Fishing, ice fishing
118
141
163
186
Flying airplane (pilot)
118
141
163
186
Football or baseball, playing catch
148
176
204
233
Football, competitive
531
633
735
838
Football, touch, flag, general
472
563
654
745
Forestry, ax chopping, fast
1003
1196
1389
1582
Forestry, ax chopping, slow
295
352
409
465
Forestry, carrying logs
649
774
899
1024
Forestry, sawing by hand
413
493
572
651
Forestry, trimming trees
531
633
735
838
Frisbee playing, general
177
211
245
279
Frisbee, ultimate frisbee
472
563
654
745
Gardening, general
236
281
327
372
General cleaning
207
246
286
326
Golf, driving range
177
211
245
279
Golf, general
266
317
368
419
Golf, miniature golf
177
211
245
279
Golf, using power cart
207
246
286
326
Golf, walking and pulling clubs
254
303
351
400
Golf, walking and carrying clubs
266
317
368
419
Gymnastics
236
281
327
372
Hacky sack
236
281
327
372
Handball
708
844
981
1117
Handball, team
472
563
654
745
Health club exercise
325
387
449
512
Hiking, cross country
354
422
490
558
Hockey, field hockey
472
563
654
745
Hockey, ice hockey
472
563
654
745
Horesback riding, saddling horse
207
246
286
326
Horse grooming
354
422
490
558
Horse racing, galloping
472
563
654
745
Horse racing, trotting
384
457
531
605
Horse racing, walking
153
183
212
242
Horseback riding
236
281
327
372
Horseback riding, grooming horse
207
246
286
326
Horseback riding, trotting
384
457
531
605
Horseback riding, walking
148
176
204
233
Horseshoe pitching
177
211
245
279
Housework, light
148
176
204
233
Housework, moderate
207
246
286
326
Housework, vigorous
236
281
327
372
Hunting, general
295
352
409
465
Hunting, large game
354
422
490
558
Hunting, small game
295
352
409
465
Ice skating, < 9 mph
325
387
449
512
Ice skating, average speed
413
493
572
651
Ice skating, rapidly
531
633
735
838
Instructing aerobic class
354
422
490
558
Jai alai
708
844
981
1117
Jazzercise
354
422
490
558
Judo, karate, jujitsu, martial arts
590
704
817
931
Juggling
236
281
327
372
Jumping rope, fast
708
844
981
1117
Jumping rope, moderate
590
704
817
931
Jumping rope, slow
472
563
654
745
Kayaking
295
352
409
465
Kick boxing
590
704
817
931
Kickball
413
493
572
651
Krav maga class
590
704
817
931
Lacrosse
472
563
654
745
Loading, unloading car
177
211
245
279
Machine tooling, sheet metal
148
176
204
233
Machine tooling, tapping, drilling
236
281
327
372
Marching band, playing instrument
236
281
327
372
Marching, rapidly, military
384
457
531
605
Masonry, concrete
413
493
572
651
Masseur, masseuse, standing
236
281
327
372
Mild stretching
148
176
204
233
Moving heavy objects, moving van
443
528
613
698
Mowing lawn, riding mower
148
176
204
233
Mowing lawn, walk, power mower
325
387
449
512
Music, playing a cello
118
141
163
186
Music, playing drums
236
281
327
372
Music, playing guitar
177
211
245
279
Music, playing piano
148
176
204
233
Music, playing trombone
207
246
286
326
Music, playing trumpet
148
176
204
233
Music, playing violin
148
176
204
233
Nursing, patient care
177
211
245
279
Orienteering
531
633
735
838
Paddle boat
236
281
327
372
Paddleball, competitive
590
704
817
931
Paddleball, playing
354
422
490
558
Painting
266
317
368
419
Pistol shooting, trap shooting, range
148
176
204
233
Playing pool, billiards
148
176
204
233
Police, directing traffic, standing
148
176
204
233
Police, making an arrest
236
281
327
372
Polo
472
563
654
745
Pushing a wheelchair
236
281
327
372
Pushing plane in and out of hanger
354
422
490
558
Pushing stroller, walking with children
148
176
204
233
Race walking
384
457
531
605
Racquetball, competitive
590
704
817
931
Racquetball, playing
413
493
572
651
Raking lawn
254
303
351
400
Riding motorcyle
148
176
204
233
Riding, snow blower
177
211
245
279
Rock climbing, ascending rock
649
774
899
1024
Rock climbing, mountain climbing
472
563
654
745
Rock climbing, rappelling
472
563
654
745
Roller blading, in-line skating
708
844
981
1117
Roller skating
413
493
572
651
Rowing machine, light
207
246
286
326
Rowing machine, moderate
413
493
572
651
Rowing machine, very vigorous
708
844
981
1117
Rowing machine, vigorous
502
598
695
791
Rugby
590
704
817
931
Running, 5 mph (12 minute mile)
472
563
654
745
Running, 5.2 mph (11.5 minute mile)
531
633
735
838
Running, 6 mph (10 min mile)
590
704
817
931
Running, 6.7 mph (9 min mile)
649
774
899
1024
Running, 7 mph (8.5 min mile)
679
809
940
1070
Running, 7.5mph (8 min mile)
738
880
1022
1163
Running, 8 mph (7.5 min mile)
797
950
1103
1256
Running, 8.6 mph (7 min mile)
826
985
1144
1303
Running, 9 mph (6.5 min mile)
885
1056
1226
1396
Running, 10 mph (6 min mile)
944
1126
1308
1489
Running, 10.9 mph (5.5 min mile)
1062
1267
1471
1675
Running, cross country
531
633
735
838
Running, general
472
563
654
745
Running, on a track, team practice
590
704
817
931
Running, stairs, up
885
1056
1226
1396
Running, training, pushing wheelchair
472
563
654
745
Sailing, competition
295
352
409
465
Sailing, yachting, ocean sailing
177
211
245
279
Shoveling snow by hand
354
422
490
558
Shoveling, digging ditches
502
598
695
791
Shuffleboard, lawn bowling
177
211
245
279
Sit, playing with animals, light
148
176
204
233
Sitting, light office work
89
106
123
140
Skateboarding
295
352
409
465
Ski machine
413
493
572
651
Ski mobiling
413
493
572
651
Skiing, water skiing
354
422
490
558
Skin diving, fast
944
1126
1308
1489
Skin diving, moderate
738
880
1022
1163
Skin diving, scuba diving
413
493
572
651
Skindiving or scuba diving
708
844
981
1117
Sky diving
177
211
245
279
Sledding, tobagganing, luge
413
493
572
651
Snorkeling
295
352
409
465
Snow shoeing
472
563
654
745
Snow skiing, downhill skiing, light
295
352
409
465
Snowmobiling
207
246
286
326
Soccer, competitive
590
704
817
931
Soccer, playing
413
493
572
651
Softball or baseball
295
352
409
465
Softball, officiating
236
281
327
372
Softball, pitching
354
422
490
558
Speed skating, ice, competitive
885
1056
1226
1396
Squash
708
844
981
1117
Stair machine
531
633
735
838
Standing, bartending, store clerk
136
162
188
214
Standing, playing with children, light
165
197
229
261
Stationary cycling, light
325
387
449
512
Stationary cycling, moderate
413
493
572
651
Stationary cycling, very light
177
211
245
279
Stationary cycling, very vigorous
738
880
1022
1163
Stationary cycling, vigorous
620
739
858
977
Steel mill, working in general
472
563
654
745
Stretching, hatha yoga
236
281
327
372
Surfing, body surfing or board surfing
177
211
245
279
Swimming backstroke
413
493
572
651
Swimming breaststroke
590
704
817
931
Swimming butterfly
649
774
899
1024
Swimming laps, freestyle, fast
590
704
817
931
Swimming laps, freestyle, slow
413
493
572
651
Swimming leisurely, not laps
354
422
490
558
Swimming sidestroke
472
563
654
745
Swimming synchronized
472
563
654
745
Swimming, treading water, fast
590
704
817
931
Swimming, treading water, moderate
236
281
327
372
Table tennis, ping pong
236
281
327
372
Tae kwan do, martial arts
590
704
817
931
Tai chi
236
281
327
372
Tailoring, general
148
176
204
233
Taking out trash
177
211
245
279
Teach exercise class (& participate)
384
457
531
605
Teach physical education class
236
281
327
372
Tennis playing
413
493
572
651
Tennis, doubles
354
422
490
558
Tennis, singles
472
563
654
745
Track and field (high jump, pole vault)
354
422
490
558
Track and field (hurdles)
590
704
817
931
Track and field (shot, discus)
236
281
327
372
Trampoline
207
246
286
326
Truck driving, loading,unloading truck
384
457
531
605
Typing, computer data entry
89
106
123
140
Unicycling
295
352
409
465
Using crutches
295
352
409
465
Volleyball playing
177
211
245
279
Volleyball, beach
472
563
654
745
Volleyball, competitive
472
563
654
745
Walk / run, playing, moderate
236
281
327
372
Walk / run, playing, vigorous
295
352
409
465
Walking 2.0 mph, slow
148
176
204
233
Walking 2.5 mph
177
211
245
279
Walking 3.0 mph, moderate
195
232
270
307
Walking 3.5 mph, brisk pace
224
267
311
354
Walking 3.5 mph, uphill
354
422
490
558
Walking 4.0 mph, very brisk
295
352
409
465
Walking 4.5 mph
372
443
515
586
Walking 5.0 mph
472
563
654
745
Walking downstairs
177
211
245
279
Walking the dog
177
211
245
279
Walking, pushing a wheelchair
236
281
327
372
Walking, snow blower
207
246
286
326
Walking, under 2.0 mph, very slow
118
141
163
186
Wallyball
413
493
572
651
Water aerobics
236
281
327
372
Water aerobics, water calisthenics
236
281
327
372
Water jogging
472
563
654
745
Water polo
590
704
817
931
Water volleyball
177
211
245
279
Watering lawn or garden
89
106
123
140
Weeding, cultivating garden
266
317
368
419
Weight lifting, body building, vigorous
354
422
490
558
Weight lifting, light workout
177
211
245
279
Whitewater rafting, kayaking,canoeing
295
352
409
465
Windsurfing, sailing
177
211
245
279
Wrestling
354
422
490
558

7 Ways to Boost Your Metabolism

Metabolism is the process of breaking down proteins, carbohydrates, and fats to yield the energy your body needs to maintain itself.  The rate of your metabolism depends on the interaction between the number of calories you consume, the number of calories you burn while eating and exercising, and or course your individual genetic makeup.A fast acting metabolism is crucial for weight loss.  Although many people are blessed with good genes and a good metabolism, those who aren’t are still in luck as there are many ways your get jump start your metabolism and keep it up high all day.

Get Your Beauty Sleep

Nothing recharges your batteries like a good night sleep.  Aim for 7 to 9 hours each night.  Your body needs enough sleep to produce and release hormones such as growth hormone and melatonin.  These regulate your biological clock, benefit your body tissues, and work as antioxidants to help you fight off illness. When these hormone levels are low your body releases a stress hormone called cortisol. Coritsol will slow down the metabolism and will assist your body in storing fat.  Deep sleep also allows the body’s cells to increase and reduce the breakdown of proteins needed for the body to function properly.

 

Eat Breakfast.

Some people try to save some calories and completely neglect one of the most important meals of the day.  When you wake up, your metabolism is running at its lowest rate of the entire day.  It is vital to get some healthy food in your system to crank your body into gear!  Try some of these great breakfast options.  When you skip breakfast, you are more likely to gorge yourself at your first meal later in the day.

Workout in the Morning

This isn’t for everyone.  If you can’t fit your workout in in the morning hours, it’s no big deal.  Work out when you can.  If you do have the option to choose when you workout mornings are great to get a jump-start on your day.  Your metabolism will be boosted for the day and it will even help you make smarter/healthier decisions for the day ahead of you.

Build Muscle

You should be weight training at least 3 times a week.  Muscle burns more calories than fat, and the more muscle you have, the more calories you burn, even at rest!  Keep in mind; most people do not lift heavy enough weights to build muscle.  Really pack on those weights and push yourself!  If you can complete 8-12 reps without a struggle you are not lifting enough.  You should push yourself until failure.

Eat 6 Small Meals A Day

Forget what you learned growing up.  By eating only three meals a day your metabolism often falls and you are more inclined to eat more than you need.  Aim for six small meals a day to control your appetite, regulate your blood sugar levels, stay energized, and build muscle mass.  Don’t neglect the most important meal of the day, protein after your workout!

Protein Protein Protein

Include lean protein with every meal.  Protein gives your body a bigger metabolic boost than eating carbohydrates or fats and keeps you feeling full longer.  Eating enough protein will also ensure you are building and maintaining muscle mass.  Be sure to include healthy protein sources, like yogurt, cheese, nuts, or beans, with every meal.

Drink up

Researchers in Germany found that subjects of a study increased their metabolic rates by 30% after drinking about 17 ounces of water. Obviously, drinking water is not the end all be all.  If you are having two Big Macs and fries for lunch, accompanying it with water will not benefit you!  Water is also a natural appetite suppressant that banishes bloat as it flushes out sodium and toxins. Drinking enough water will help keep you from mistaking thirst for hunger.

 

Hungry? Your Stomach Really Does Have a Mind of Its Own

VEVEY, Switzerland

A group of Nestle SA researchers here are on an unusual mission: They hope to create new foods based on gut instinct.

Not the type of instinct one normally equates with intuitive decision-making, but the sophisticated processes that take place in our digestive tracts to let us know when we’re hungry. There, a collection of nerve cells work together and communicate much as the neurons in our brain do. It’s essentially an autonomous and self-governing second brain that we all carry in our belly.

I Am, Therefore I’m Hungry

The “gut brain,” formally known as the enteric nervous system, is made up of some 500 million nerve cells, as many as there are in a cat’s brain. They help to control muscular contractions in the gut as well as the secretions of glands and cells. And they help balance hunger and satiety, or the sense of being full, communicating those states to the big brain.

Nestle, one of the world’s largest food companies, hopes to develop new types of foods that, essentially, seek to trick the gut brain. The foods could make people feel full earlier, or stay full longer, in order to curb the desire to eat more. For example, cooking french fries in oil that gets digested more slowly than regular oil could confer a longer-lasting sense of satiety, researchers speculate.

“This means that people will report a sense of fullness more quickly,” says Heribert Watzke, a senior food scientist at Nestle. “That tells the big brain to stop eating.”

Nestle says products using its new science could be available within five years. Widely known for its chocolate, the company makes a broad array of foods including cereal, drinks, coffee, frozen meals, bottled water and pet food.

This avenue of food science, which is also being pursued by other food companies, could represent a fresh assault in the fight against flab. One in four Americans is obese, and obesity rates are also rising dramatically in parts of Europe, Asia and the Middle East. Although food companies have long tried to make effective fat-fighting food, their results have been modest.

Nestle and other food giants are now on a push to decipher the language of satiety—the complex signals our gut brain sends to the big brain—and use that knowledge to make better satiety-inducing foods, or foods that make you feel full longer. Nerve cells in the gut are located in the tissues lining the esophagus, stomach, small intestine and colon. Like the central nervous system, the gut brain makes use of neurotransmitters such as serotonin and dopamine.

Tracking the movement of food in a person’s gastrointestinal tract isn’t easy. So at a “digestion lab”—part of Nestle’s sprawling research and development center here—scientists use a million-dollar model of the human gut.

The machine is about the size of a large refrigerator. It has several compartments linked by valves, and it is carefully calibrated to the body’s temperature. The entire setup is controlled by a computer. The front is glass, allowing observers to watch as food travels through the system.

On a recent day, the “stomach” section at the top slowly squeezed and churned a salt solution, just like the real thing. The liquefied result then wended its way down the other tubes, representing other sections of the digestive tract. At each stage, tiny valves released the appropriate salt, bile and enzymes, which helped to digest the food.

The body is in a state of continual hunger—its default position. But several factors work to curtail the hunger instinct, such as the presence of food in the digestive tract, or the flow of nutrients in the blood. When these satiety factors dissipate, the body again demands food.

In the quest to balance hunger and satiety, the gut brain and big brain communicate via neural signals. When food enters the stomach, the stomach stretches, and the gut brain sends a neural message to the big brain. The gut brain also knows when there are nutrients in the gastrointestinal tract, stimulating the release of peptides into the blood and resulting in another message to the brain.

A peptide release is also part of the “ileal brake” mechanism. The ileum is the lower part of the small intestine. Fat penetrates there when there’s too much for the body to process, triggering an “I’m full” message to the big brain.

Nestle has run some early-stage experiments on foods using its artificial gut model. In a paper published in the journal Food Biophysics last year , Dr. Watzke and colleagues described one such experiment using olive oil. They first measured how long it took the artificial gut to digest olive oil at the natural rate. Then, they added a compound called monoglyceride, which formed a protective coat around the oil molecules, making it harder for the gut’s juices to break through and digest the oil.

The Nestle scientists monitored the oil’s progress as it gradually went through the system. They found it took eight times longer for the machine to “digest” the olive oil-monoglyceride combination compared with the olive oil alone. This resulted in more undigested oil reaching the small intestine. In the human body, this could lead to a stronger ileal brake signal of fullness to the big brain.

Food companies have been trying to make effective satiety-inducing foods for years, but with little success. Danone SA of France, for example, launched in the U.S. a nonfat yogurt “Light & Fit Crave Control,” whose combination of fiber and protein was intended to help people stave off hunger. But it was taken off the market in 2007 “because it wasn’t our best tasting product,” a spokesman says.

Food companies, including Unilever, have experimented with foods that activate the ileal brake. But Nestle researchers found that a food that only triggers the ileal brake mechanism likely won’t be enough to induce satiety, or win over a lot of consumers. “You’ve got undigested fat in your ileum, so it can end up making you feel queasy,” says Hilary Green, a spokeswoman for Nestle’s R&D center and a physiologist.

Who’s the Boss?

Even when we’re full, our big brain can overrule signals from the gut brain telling us to stop eating. Some messages that can cause us to eat even when we’re not hungry:

  • Cultural or social expectations, such as ‘it’s dinnertime’
  • The aroma or visual appeal of food
  • Psychological compulsion such as ‘stress eating

Nestle is now pushing for a multi-faceted approach, one that targets several key neural signals sent by the gut brain and attacks the satiety problem in multiple ways at once. The Swiss company says it has a good understanding of the science and is now racing to make foods with the new technology. Nestle declined to say which foods its research might lead to, although Dr. Watzke says a hypothetical example could be a vegetable oil that could go in a dressing or be used for cooking.

Scientists say the gut brain reflects millions of years of evolution. The original nervous system possessed by the earliest life forms was a rudimentary gut brain that regulated digestion, they say.

Because higher animals needed more brain power in order to seek out food and sex, they eventually developed a second, big brain, allied to a central nervous system. At the same time, humans and other higher-end animals kept their enteric nervous system. Another shift likely occurred when humans learned to prepare food, specifically through cooking. When grains are ground, or leaves are cooked, they become more digestible, allowing more nutrients to get absorbed by the body.

“The brain in the gut has a complex language,” says Dr. Watzke. “We need to understand it properly” before we can make true satiety-inducing foods.

Celebrities Struggle with Their Weight Too!

Though she seems to have it all—fame, fortune and a happy marriage—fun-loving reality star Khloe Kardashian admits that she has her struggles like everyone else, especially when it comes to body image.

“My weight is always going up and down. I’m always fighting that, and I feel like no matter what I do, I never look good enough to everybody else,” Kardashian, 26, admits in a video Q&A on her blog. “But that’s been a struggle that I think I’ve gotten a hold of, not caring what other people think. Now I just have my body to how I like it.”

Despite feeling more comfortable in her skin, Kardashian says she isn’t immune to being constantly compared to sisters Kim, 30, and Kourtney, 31, and the speculation that she’s pregnant any time she puts on a pound.

“Other people’s words eventually do come and hit you hard,” she says. “My weight is my biggest lifetime struggle. It’s not the biggest thing in life, but it does get you down sometimes.”

The Marquee Blog

The LaLanne Pushup

Jack LaLanne (September 26, 1914 – January 23, 2011) was a fitness, exercise, and nutritional expert and motivational speaker who has helped so many to reach their goals.  He has been known as “the godfather of fitness” and a “fitness superhero.”

Jack always trained as he was training for the Olympics.  When weight lifting he would always go until it was impossible for him to go on.  Truly an inspirational man who could teach us all a world of knowledge.  This week, try a new move on his behalf, the LaLanne push up! 

  1. Place feet a little wider than shoulder width and extend arms all the way over head in line with your shoulders.  Arms should be straight. In the “up” position you’ll have a slight bend in your hips.
  2. Lower body from three points– your hips, elbows, and shoulders. No point will bend very much–just make sure the downward travel movement is equal from all three points as you drop a few inches.
  3. Push hard through hands and use core to lift body back into starting position. Repeat until failure as Jack would do!

The stronger your core muscles are the easier this exercise will be as it is primarily a test of core and shoulder strength.  This is not easy and could take some of you a few months to master.  But once you do, try it on your finger tips for an extra challenge.  Hey, even Jack could do it at age 90!

Gym makes you pay more when you DON’T go

Interesting article from The Next Web.  Harvard grads have come up with a program that will make you pay when you miss a workout.  Thoughts?  If you can’t find the motivation elsewhere, would saving money get YOU to the gym???

Article:

It’s the time of the year when everyone signs up for a yearly subscription to their favorite gym that more often than not, are only used a couple of weeks but due to laziness, busy schedules, or whatever reason are completely neglected throughout the year. Two Harvard graduates, however, are determined to change that.

Gym-pact is the brain child of Yifan Zhang and Geoff Oberhofer, who thought of an effective way to motivate people to visit the gym regularly. According to Zhang, one of the problems is that most members see gym membership fees as money spent, or “a sunk cost, especially if you pay at the beginning of the year.’’

Gym-pact offers what Zhang calls “motivational fees” where customers agree to pay more if they miss their scheduled workouts. They came up with the concept from their behavioral economics class in Harvard where they were taught that people are more motivated by immediate consequences than future possibilities.

True enough, after thinking about it, it’s more difficult for for anyone to have to dish out cash while missing a gym session rather that say, gaining a couple of pounds, a bigger waistline, or other health consequences that may or may not even happen in the future. This might not be a crazy idea after all.

Basically, Gym-pact operates by negotiating a group rate with Planet Fitness, then paying off the membership fees for participants. They will agree on a weekly schedule and if the members miss a session or opt out of the program for unexcused reasons, they will have to pay. That money will be used to pay for more gym memberships and to build a financial aid fund. The company will eventually make money from referral fees and revenue-sharing affiliate programs with gyms.

The founders plan to tweak the fee structure to allow it to be customized to a customer’s goals. Future iterations may include a combination of discounted gym memberships and smaller penalties that apply daily rather than weekly.

This just might be the gym program that will be get me back into shape. Gyms could really learn a thing or two from this and I hope to see more of it around the globe.

Count on Yoga: 38 Ways Yoga Keeps You Fit

By Timothy McCall, M.D.

Are you looking for reasons to start practicing? Here are ways yoga improves your health—reasons enough to roll out the mat and get started.

If you’re a passionate yoga practitioner, you’ve probably noticed the ways yoga works—maybe you’re sleeping better or getting fewer colds or just feeling more relaxed and at ease. But if you’ve ever tried telling a newbie how it works, you might find that explanations like “It increases the flow of prana” or “It brings energy up your spine” fall on deaf or skeptical ears.

As it happens, Western science is starting to provide some concrete clues as to how yoga works to improve health, heal aches and pains, and keep sickness at bay. Once you understand them, you’ll have even more motivation to step onto your mat, and you probably won’t feel so tongue-tied the next time someone wants Western proof.

I myself have experienced yoga’s healing power in a very real way. Weeks before a trip to India in 2002 to investigate yoga therapy, I developed numbness and tingling in my right hand. After first considering scary things like a brain tumor and multiple sclerosis, I figured out that the cause of the symptoms was thoracic outlet syndrome, a nerve blockage in my neck and chest.

Despite the uncomfortable symptoms, I realized how useful my condition could be during my trip. While visiting various yoga therapy centers, I would submit myself for evaluation and treatment by the various experts I’d arranged to observe. I could try their suggestions and see what worked for me. While this wasn’t exactly a controlled scientific experiment, I knew that such hands-on learning could teach me things I might not otherwise understand.

My experiment proved illuminating. At the Vivekananda ashram just outside of Bangalore, S. Nagarathna, M.D., recommended breathing exercises in which I imagined bringing prana (vital energy) into my right upper chest. Other therapy included asana, pranayama, meditation, chanting, lectures on philosophy, and various kriya (internal cleansing practices). At the Krishnamacharya Yoga Mandiram in Chennai and from A.G. Mohan and his wife, Indra, who practice just outside of Chennai, I was told to stop practicing Headstand and Shoulderstand in favor of gentle asana coordinated with the breath. In Pune, S.V. Karandikar, a medical doctor, recommended practices with ropes and belts to put traction on my spine and exercises that taught me to use my shoulder blades to open my upper back.

Thanks to the techniques I learned in India, advice from teachers in the United States, and my own exploration, my chest is more flexible than it was, my posture has improved, and for more than a year, I’ve been free of symptoms.

My experience inspired me to pore over the scientific studies I’d collected in India as well as the West to identify and explain how yoga can both prevent disease and help you recover from it. Here is what I found.

Flex Time
1 Improved flexibility is one of the first and most obvious benefits of yoga. During your first class, you probably won’t be able to touch your toes, never mind do a backbend. But if you stick with it, you’ll notice a gradual loosening, and eventually, seemingly impossible poses will become possible. You’ll also probably notice that aches and pains start to disappear. That’s no coincidence. Tight hips can strain the knee joint due to improper alignment of the thigh and shinbones. Tight hamstrings can lead to a flattening of the lumbar spine, which can cause back pain. And inflexibility in muscles and connective tissue, such as fascia and ligaments, can cause poor posture.

Strength Test
2 Strong muscles do more than look good. They also protect us from conditions like arthritis and back pain, and help prevent falls in elderly people. And when you build strength through yoga, you balance it with flexibility. If you just went to the gym and lifted weights, you might build strength at the expense of flexibility.

Standing Orders
3 Your head is like a bowling ball—big, round, and heavy. When it’s balanced directly over an erect spine, it takes much less work for your neck and back muscles to support it. Move it several inches forward, however, and you start to strain those muscles. Hold up that forward-leaning bowling ball for eight or 12 hours a day and it’s no wonder you’re tired. And fatigue might not be your only problem. Poor posture can cause back, neck, and other muscle and joint problems. As you slump, your body may compensate by flattening the normal inward curves in your neck and lower back. This can cause pain and degenerative arthritis of the spine.

Joint Account
4 Each time you practice yoga, you take your joints through their full range of motion. This can help prevent degenerative arthritis or mitigate disability by “squeezing and soaking” areas of cartilage that normally aren’t used. Joint cartilage is like a sponge; it receives fresh nutrients only when its fluid is squeezed out and a new supply can be soaked up. Without proper sustenance, neglected areas of cartilage can eventually wear out, exposing the underlying bone like worn-out brake pads.

Spinal Rap
5 Spinal disks—the shock absorbers between the vertebrae that can herniate and compress nerves—crave movement. That’s the only way they get their nutrients. If you’ve got a well-balanced asana practice with plenty of backbends, forward bends, and twists, you’ll help keep your disks supple.

Bone Zone
6 It’s well documented that weight-bearing exercise strengthens bones and helps ward off osteoporosis. Many postures in yoga require that you lift your own weight. And some, like Downward- and Upward-Facing Dog, help strengthen the arm bones, which are particularly vulnerable to osteoporotic fractures. In an unpublished study conducted at California State University, Los Angeles, yoga practice increased bone density in the vertebrae. Yoga’s ability to lower levels of the stress hormone cortisol (see Number 11) may help keep calcium in the bones.

Flow Chart
7 Yoga gets your blood flowing. More specifically, the relaxation exercises you learn in yoga can help your circulation, especially in your hands and feet. Yoga also gets more oxygen to your cells, which function better as a result. Twisting poses are thought to wring out venous blood from internal organs and allow oxygenated blood to flow in once the twist is released. Inverted poses, such as Headstand, Handstand, and Shoulderstand, encourage venous blood from the legs and pelvis to flow back to the heart, where it can be pumped to the lungs to be freshly oxygenated. This can help if you have swelling in your legs from heart or kidney problems. Yoga also boosts levels of hemoglobin and red blood cells, which carry oxygen to the tissues. And it thins the blood by making platelets less sticky and by cutting the level of clot-promoting proteins in the blood. This can lead to a decrease in heart attacks and strokes since blood clots are often the cause of these killers.

Lymph Lesson
8 When you contract and stretch muscles, move organs around, and come in and out of yogapostures, you increase the drainage of lymph (a viscous fluid rich in immune cells). This helps the lymphatic system fight infection, destroy cancerous cells, and dispose of the toxic waste products of cellular functioning.

Heart Start
9 When you regularly get your heart rate into the aerobic range, you lower your risk of heart attack and can relieve depression. While not all yoga is aerobic, if you do it vigorously or take flow or Ashtanga classes, it can boost your heart rate into the aerobic range. But even yoga exercises that don’t get your heart rate up that high can improve cardiovascular conditioning. Studies have found that yoga practice lowers the resting heart rate, increases endurance, and can improve your maximum uptake of oxygen during exercise—all reflections of improved aerobic conditioning. One study found that subjects who were taught only pranayama could do more exercise with less oxygen.

Pressure Drop
10 If you’ve got high blood pressure, you might benefit from yoga. Two studies of people with hypertension, published in the British medical journal The Lancet, compared the effects of Savasana (Corpse Pose) with simply lying on a couch. After three months, Savasana was associated with a 26-point drop in systolic blood pressure (the top number) and a 15-point drop in diastolic blood pressure (the bottom number—and the higher the initial blood pressure, the bigger the drop.

Worry Thwarts
11 Yoga lowers cortisol levels. If that doesn’t sound like much, consider this. Normally, the adrenal glands secrete cortisol in response to an acute crisis, which temporarily boosts immune function. If your cortisol levels stay high even after the crisis, they can compromise the immune system. Temporary boosts of cortisol help with long-term memory, but chronically high levels undermine memory and may lead to permanent changes in the brain. Additionally, excessive cortisol has been linked with major depression, osteoporosis (it extracts calcium and other minerals from bones and interferes with the laying down of new bone), high blood pressure, and insulin resistance. In rats, high cortisol levels lead to what researchers call “food-seeking behavior” (the kind that drives you to eat when you’re upset, angry, or stressed). The body takes those extra calories and distributes them as fat in the abdomen, contributing to weight gain and the risk of diabetes and heart attack.

Happy Hour
12 Feeling sad? Sit in Lotus. Better yet, rise up into a backbend or soar royally into King Dancer Pose. While it’s not as simple as that, one study found that a consistent yoga practice improved depression and led to a significant increase in serotonin levels and a decrease in the levels of monoamine oxidase (an enzyme that breaks down neurotransmitters) and cortisol. At the University of Wisconsin, Richard Davidson, Ph.D., found that the left prefrontal cortex showed heightened activity in meditators, a finding that has been correlated with greater levels of happiness and better immune function. More dramatic left-sided activation was found in dedicated, long-term practitioners.

Weighty Matters
13 Move more, eat less—that’s the adage of many a dieter. Yoga can help on both fronts. A regular practice gets you moving and burns calories, and the spiritual and emotional dimensions of your practice may encourage you to address any eating and weight problems on a deeper level. Yoga may also inspire you to become a more conscious eater.

Low Show
14 Yoga lowers blood sugar and LDL (“bad”) cholesterol and boosts HDL (“good”) cholesterol. In people with diabetes, yoga has been found to lower blood sugar in several ways: by lowering cortisol and adrenaline levels, encouraging weight loss, and improving sensitivity to the effects of insulin. Get your blood sugar levels down, and you decrease your risk of diabetic complications such as heart attack, kidney failure, and blindness.

Brain Waves
15 An important component of yoga is focusing on the present. Studies have found that regular yoga practice improves coordination, reaction time, memory, and even IQ scores. People who practice Transcendental Meditation demonstrate the ability to solve problems and acquire and recall information better—probably because they’re less distracted by their thoughts, which can play over and over like an endless tape loop.

Nerve Center
16 Yoga encourages you to relax, slow your breath, and focus on the present, shifting the balance from the sympathetic nervous system (or the fight-or-flight response) to the parasympathetic nervous system. The latter is calming and restorative; it lowers breathing and heart rates, decreases blood pressure, and increases blood flow to the intestines and reproductive organs—comprising what Herbert Benson, M.D., calls the relaxation response.

Space Place
17 Regularly practicing yoga increases proprioception (the ability to feel what your body is doing and where it is in space) and improves balance. People with bad posture or dysfunctional movement patterns usually have poor proprioception, which has been linked to knee problems and back pain. Better balance could mean fewer falls. For the elderly, this translates into more independence and delayed admission to a nursing home or never entering one at all. For the rest of us, postures like Tree Pose can make us feel less wobbly on and off the mat.

Control Center
18 Some advanced yogis can control their bodies in extraordinary ways, many of which are mediated by the nervous system. Scientists have monitored yogis who could induce unusual heart rhythms, generate specific brain-wave patterns, and, using a meditation technique, raise the temperature of their hands by 15 degrees Fahrenheit. If they can use yoga to do that, perhaps you could learn to improve blood flow to your pelvis if you’re trying to get pregnant or induce relaxation when you’re having trouble falling asleep.

Loose Limbs
19 Do you ever notice yourself holding the telephone or a steering wheel with a death grip or scrunching your face when staring at a computer screen? These unconscious habits can lead to chronic tension, muscle fatigue, and soreness in the wrists, arms, shoulders, neck, and face, which can increase stress and worsen your mood. As you practice yoga, you begin to notice where you hold tension: It might be in your tongue, your eyes, or the muscles of your face and neck. If you simply tune in, you may be able to release some tension in the tongue and eyes. With bigger muscles like the quadriceps, trapezius, and buttocks, it may take years of practice to learn how to relax them.

Chill Pill
20 Stimulation is good, but too much of it taxes the nervous system. Yoga can provide relief from the hustle and bustle of modern life. Restorative asana, yoga nidra (a form of guided relaxation), Savasana, pranayama, and meditation encourage pratyahara, a turning inward of the senses, which provides downtime for the nervous system. Another by-product of a regular yoga practice, studies suggest, is better sleep—which means you’ll be less tired and stressed and less likely to have accidents.

Immune Boon
21 Asana and pranayama probably improve immune function, but, so far, meditation has the strongest scientific support in this area. It appears to have a beneficial effect on the functioning of the immune system, boosting it when needed (for example, raising antibody levels in response to a vaccine) and lowering it when needed (for instance, mitigating an inappropriately aggressive immune function in an autoimmune disease like psoriasis).

Breathing Room
22 Yogis tend to take fewer breaths of greater volume, which is both calming and more efficient. A 1998 study published in The Lancet taught a yogic technique known as “complete breathing” to people with lung problems due to congestive heart failure. After one month, their average respiratory rate decreased from 13.4 breaths per minute to 7.6. Meanwhile, their exercise capacity increased significantly, as did the oxygen saturation of their blood. In addition, yoga has been shown to improve various measures of lung function, including the maximum volume of the breath and the efficiency of the exhalation. Yoga also promotes breathing through the nose, which filters the air, warms it (cold, dry air is more likely to trigger an asthma attack in people who are sensitive), and humidifies it, removing pollen and dirt and other things you’d rather not take into your lungs.

Poop Scoop
23 Ulcers, irritable bowel syndrome, constipation—all of these can be exacerbated by stress. So if you stress less, you’ll suffer less. Yoga, like any physical exercise, can ease constipation—and theoretically lower the risk of colon cancer—because moving the body facilitates more rapid transport of food and waste products through the bowels. And, although it has not been studied scientifically, yogis suspect that twisting poses may be beneficial in getting waste to move through the system.

Peace of Mind
24 Yoga quells the fluctuations of the mind, according to Patanjali’s Yoga Sutra. In other words, it slows down the mental loops of frustration, regret, anger, fear, and desire that can cause stress. And since stress is implicated in so many health problems—from migraines and insomnia to lupus, MS, eczema, high blood pressure, and heart attacks—if you learn to quiet your mind, you’ll be likely to live longer and healthier.

Divine Sign
25 Many of us suffer from chronic low self-esteem. If you handle this negatively—take drugs, overeat, work too hard, sleep around—you may pay the price in poorer health physically, mentally, and spiritually. If you take a positive approach and practice yoga, you’ll sense, initially in brief glimpses and later in more sustained views, that you’re worthwhile or, as yogic philosophy teaches, that you are a manifestation of the Divine. If you practice regularly with an intention of self-examination and betterment—not just as a substitute for an aerobics class—you can access a different side of yourself. You’ll experience feelings of gratitude, empathy, and forgiveness, as well as a sense that you’re part of something bigger. While better health is not the goal of spirituality, it’s often a by-product, as documented by repeated scientific studies.

Pain Drain
26 Yoga can ease your pain. According to several studies, asana, meditation, or a combination of the two, reduced pain in people with arthritis, back pain, fibromyalgia, carpal tunnel syndrome, and other chronic conditions. When you relieve your pain, your mood improves, you’re more inclined to be active, and you don’t need as much medication.

Heat Treatment
27 Yoga can help you make changes in your life. In fact, that might be its greatest strength. Tapas, the Sanskrit word for “heat,” is the fire, the discipline that fuels yoga practice and that regular practice builds. The tapas you develop can be extended to the rest of your life to overcome inertia and change dysfunctional habits. You may find that without making a particular effort to change things, you start to eat better, exercise more, or finally quit smoking after years of failed attempts.

Guru Gifts
28 Good yoga teachers can do wonders for your health. Exceptional ones do more than guide you through the postures. They can adjust your posture, gauge when you should go deeper in poses or back off, deliver hard truths with compassion, help you relax, and enhance and personalize your practice. A respectful relationship with a teacher goes a long way toward promoting your health.

Drug Free
29 If your medicine cabinet looks like a pharmacy, maybe it’s time to try yoga. Studies of people with asthma, high blood pressure, Type II diabetes (formerly called adult-onset diabetes), and obsessive-compulsive disorder have shown that yoga helped them lower their dosage of medications and sometimes get off them entirely. The benefits of taking fewer drugs? You’ll spend less money, and you’re less likely to suffer side effects and risk dangerous drug interactions.

Hostile Makeover
30 Yoga and meditation build awareness. And the more aware you are, the easier it is to break free of destructive emotions like anger. Studies suggest that chronic anger and hostility are as strongly linked to heart attacks as are smoking, diabetes, and elevated cholesterol. Yoga appears to reduce anger by increasing feelings of compassion and interconnection and by calming the nervous system and the mind. It also increases your ability to step back from the drama of your own life, to remain steady in the face of bad news or unsettling events. You can still react quickly when you need to—and there’s evidence that yoga speeds reaction time—but you can take that split second to choose a more thoughtful approach, reducing suffering for yourself and others.

Good Relations
31 Love may not conquer all, but it certainly can aid in healing. Cultivating the emotional support of friends, family, and community has been demonstrated repeatedly to improve health and healing. A regular yoga practice helps develop friendliness, compassion, and greater equanimity. Along with yogic philosophy’s emphasis on avoiding harm to others, telling the truth, and taking only what you need, this may improve many of your relationships.

Sound System
32 The basics of yoga—asana, pranayama, and meditation—all work to improve your health, but there’s more in the yoga toolbox. Consider chanting. It tends to prolong exhalation, which shifts the balance toward the parasympathetic nervous system. When done in a group, chanting can be a particularly powerful physical and emotional experience. A recent study from Sweden’s Karolinska Institute suggests that humming sounds—like those made while chanting Om—open the sinuses and facilitate drainage.

Vision Quest
33 If you contemplate an image in your mind’s eye, as you do in yoga nidra and other practices, you can effect change in your body. Several studies have found that guided imagery reduced postoperative pain, decreased the frequency of headaches, and improved the quality of life for people with cancer and HIV.

Clean Machine
34 Kriyas, or cleansing practices, are another element of yoga. They include everything from rapid breathing exercises to elaborate internal cleansings of the intestines. Jala neti, which entails a gentle lavage of the nasal passages with salt water, removes pollen and viruses from the nose, keeps mucus from building up, and helps drains the sinuses.

Karma Concept
35 Karma yoga (service to others) is integral to yogic philosophy. And while you may not be inclined to serve others, your health might improve if you do. A study at the University of Michigan found that older people who volunteered a little less than an hour per week were three times as likely to be alive seven years later. Serving others can give meaning to your life, and your problems may not seem so daunting when you see what other people are dealing with.

Healing Hope
36 In much of conventional medicine, most patients are passive recipients of care. In yoga, it’s what you do for yourself that matters. Yoga gives you the tools to help you change, and you might start to feel better the first time you try practicing. You may also notice that the more you commit to practice, the more you benefit. This results in three things: You get involved in your own care, you discover that your involvement gives you the power to effect change, and seeing that you can effect change gives you hope. And hope itself can be healing.

Connective Tissue
37 As you read all the ways yoga improves your health, you probably noticed a lot of overlap. That’s because they’re intensely interwoven. Change your posture and you change the way you breathe. Change your breathing and you change your nervous system. This is one of the great lessons of yoga: Everything is connected—your hipbone to your anklebone, you to your community, your community to the world. This interconnection is vital to understanding yoga. This holistic system simultaneously taps into many mechanisms that have additive and even multiplicative effects. This synergy may be the most important way of all that yoga heals.

Placebo Power
38 Just believing you will get better can make you better. Unfortunately, many conventional scientists believe that if something works by eliciting the placebo effect, it doesn’t count. But most patients just want to get better, so if chanting a mantra—like you might do at the beginning or end of yoga class or throughout a meditation or in the course of your day—facilitates healing, even if it’s just a placebo effect, why not do it?

Make Exercise Fun

 

There are way to many options out there to get adequate exercise for you to feel constricted to a treadmill staring at a wall.  Find what works for you and have fun!  It’ll make losing weight much easier and enjoyable.

How to Overcome Binge Eating

Helpful advice on binge eating from experts, former binge eaters and Oprah Winfrey herself . See the full article from cnn.com

1. Realize you can change

“The most pervasive misconception about binge eating is that it’s hopeless, that I’m hopeless,” says Ellen Shuman, vice president of the Binge Eating Disorder Association.

“There is recovery from binge eating disorders.”

2. Identify your emotional distress

Winfrey says at first, she thought it was all about the food.

“I thought I just wanted some macaroni,” she said on her show in 1999.

On the show, Winfrey told book author Gary Zukav it took her a while to connect the eating with her emotional distress.

“I didn’t connect the powerlessness until just this moment,” she said.

3. Just before a binge, remind yourself why you’re binging

Let’s dissect a binge. Before the actual eating occurs, the binger has what Shuman calls a “food thought” — a thought that eating would be a good idea.

Before that thought turns into action, try to figure out why you’re eating, Shuman suggests.

Just last weekend, Shuman, who suffered binge eating disorder for decades, had a food thought that could have turned into a binge but didn’t.

“I asked myself, ‘What am I feeling right now?’ she says. “I realized I had food thoughts because I had to write something for my website, but I didn’t want to do it. I just wanted to watch two DVDs I had at home and have dinner with my friends.”

She decided instead of eating, she’d write for three hours, which would leave her enough time to watch one of the DVDs and have dinner. She says making that plan averted using food as an emotional crutch.

4. Figure out if you’re distorting the truth

Once you identify the emotion that’s leading to the binge, you should then ask yourself whether you’re upset over nothing.

“I remember once I was upset because someone at work passed my desk and kept going,” Shuman remembers. “I thought to myself, ‘Did I do something to upset them? Did I do something that made them not like me anymore?’ Later I learned they had an emergency call from their kid, and they were running to their office to take the call.”

The lesson: “I learned I was binging over something that wasn’t even true.”

Shuman says if she’d been counseling Winfrey at the time, she would have encouraged her to think about the significance of her disappointing movie sales and the criticism of her show.

“I would have told her the critics and the public have the right to their opinion, and it shouldn’t cause Oprah to feel badly about Oprah because their opinions didn’t match hers,” she says.

“I would have said, ‘Does it mean you’ll never be able to make a good movie ever again? No. And while you have every right to feel upset, what value is there to doing damage to yourself by binging?’ ”

5. Feel the sadness

When something is truly sad, sometimes you just have to feel it, O’Malley says.

“On the morning of September 11, I woke up and turned on the TV,” she remembers. “I was overwhelmed with calls from clients, and we had a group that evening and as soon as the last person left, I felt panicked and overwhelmed inside.”

She went to the bedroom to get her purse, and then to the car, intending to buy food for a binge.

“I recognized what was going on inside me. My compulsion said to go to the store, and I said to my compulsion, ‘We can go to the store, but I’ll remind you we don’t feel very well when we do that.’ I said to my compulsion, ‘Can you give me five minutes?’ ”

Then, O’Malley went to the porch and cried for five minutes. When she was done, the urge to binge was gone.

“I don’t know exactly what was going on, maybe just sadness or maybe fear of the terrorists,” she says. “All I know is I had this uncomfortable, yucky feeling, and I wanted to get away from it. But when I let the sadness arrive and pass through me, there was no need to binge.”

The Inside Story on School Lunches

I came across a very interesting blog of an anonymous teacher (Mrs. Q) from an anonymous urban school today.  This incredible teacher committed to eating school lunches every day of the work week for an entire year.  Not only did she eat the lunch herself but she also talked to the children and got their take on particular lunches as well.  One kid told her he ate 6 of the cookies offered one day, at 300 calories a pop, he had over a days worth of calories within about 10 minutes. 

I think Mrs. Q did a great job with this experiment and was not trying to target anyone that works in the cafeteria.  She knows they care about the students and that they are just doing their jobs.  She wasn’t all about bashing either.  She gave props when props were due. 

This experiment overall really shows the changes we need to make nationwide to school lunches.  After browsing the ‘food’ she endured daily I give Mrs. Q so much credit.  I am not confident that I could have lasted even one week and she stuck to it for one year, even after forcing down food I wouldn’t even feed to my dog.  See some ‘highlights’ below.

 

Bagel Dog…don’t ask me what this is.

Cheeseburger and other yellow things

Cheese on a croissant

Chili and a frozen fruit cup

Lasagna

Meat sauce with pasta

Meatloaf with mystery greens

Nuggets….and we all know where these came from.

Pizza….?

Pop-corn chicken, tator tots, and bread. Props for the banana.

“Steak”

I’d like to thank Mrs. Q for the experiment and can’t wait to hear what will come of it.  I am definitely looking forward to her upcoming book.  Check out Mrs Q’s blog, Fed Up with Lunch, for the full recap.

Do YOU think you could eat school lunches for one year?

 

 

 

 

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